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Steph

Word Of The Day ... Or Week Or Whatever

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Oh CRIPES, Steph!

I was temporarily forgetting the Dec.13 post where you brought up the 'K thing'! :blush:

Happy New Year, Hoody!

Regarding 'panache', my first thought was that since the 'brins' are the sticks, maybe

the 'panache' is just the paper. But that would probably be too easy.

Found an ad for a fancy 'leather and lace' fan. With this one the leather was the

structural 'paper' part, and the lace was basically additional ornamentation. So at

this point I'm guessing that lace bit was the 'panache'. It does seem to be a rare term.

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Some people here use the word "panache",it means something like flamboyant a kind of bravura and courage.

It's of French origin,the literal translation is a feather plume.

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Just found a fan for sale which included these lines in the description.

One side is eye-catching hand-painted cherry blossoms on gold leaf paper. The panache (end pieces) are bamboo, lacquered black, painted with a gold foil pattern, and the brin are also made of bamboo, stained dark brown. The painting is only on one side of the fan.

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I was certain that fomenting must be some sort of 'typo'.

But apparently it means 'to stir up' in the 'fan the flames' sort of way.

Never heard of it. :dunno:

foment_zpsaqventam.jpg

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:thup::)





whid:

verb (used without object), whidded, whidding.
1.
to move quickly and quietly.

noun
2.
a quick, noiseless movement.

Rabbits whid. :)

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I'm so grateful for the quick responses!

Couldn't resist doing this, but was feeling terribly guilty that

the joke required temporarily holding off on my serious reply to be 'effective'.

I think 'whid' is my favorite 'wotd' so far!

Hard to explain why I like it so much.

I'm sure one part of it is the 'efficiency'.

The only expression we have for ninja locomotion is to 'move stealthfully'.

Whid is so much better! ( :

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Whid is good, but I'm still stuck on "holt." I like that one particularly. Maybe it's because I like otters.

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"phthalein"

doesn't matter what it means ... it's just fun to spell.

Like "rhythm" ... which was fun when playing hangman

"hemorrhage" ... was proud when I finally learned to spell that one

I ghuess I lhike the "h" whords.

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au·ber·gine
ˈōbərˌZHēn/
noun
BRITISH
  1. another term for eggplant.
    • a dark purple color like that of eggplant.

 

I recognized that I had most of that word in my Scrabble letters.  The word seemed quite familiar in fact. And yet I had no clue what it meant.  ... but now I do. :)

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I like this one.  Definitely new to me.

For some reason it immediately sounded like a 'Southern Belle' name.

I could hear the 'coming out' party announcement "Miss Aubergine Montgomery!",

as the young lady debutante began her slow descent down the stairs.  ( :

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:icon_popcorn: - brilliant. Aubergine is as british noun? I always thought they also know it as 'eggplant' and the origins of 'aubergine' are French. We use it in Germany for exactly the eggplant fruit and all people I know pronounce it a way that resembles me to French speaking. Maybe that is why kbobam just thought of a lady from the south.

Names have their very special handling throughout the cultures and regions. I just think of 'Heike'. Here in Germany we use it as a female name but there is this male Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heike_Kamerlingh_Onnes).

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:)

 

English has many names which started out male but are mostly female now.

Got this list from Wikipedia: Ashley, Beverly, Evelyn, Hilary, Jocelyn, Joyce, Kelly, Lynn, Meredith, Shannon, Shirley, Sidney, Vivian, and Whitney

Supposedly all those were once masculine names but most of them sound completely feminine to my American ears.  

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