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duffy
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got this this morning....

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its a ring any bakelite experts out there??

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to check to see if something is bakelite, you need to go to auto parts store and pick up some chrome cleaner, put a little polish on a white rag and rub it on it,, if the rag turns yellow then its bakelite,, if not then im guessing its another type plastic(older),, bj

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thanks big john...im really thinkin it lucite or sumptin like that...i wish i woulda had more cash i prob coulda got that whole tub of costume jewelery for 50$ or so...i got a neat fossil watch,too...

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Steve,

Just heat up a needle red hot and see if it melts into the piece. Bakelight will not allow the needle to penetrate. The polish test we use Simichrome polish if it turns green its bakelight! Good luck and see ya in a couple of weeks.

Bruce

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I believe the best test is what Steph said. But instead of using water just rub the piece with your hand (fingers)real quick(friction). If you get that chemical smell it's bakelite.

I agree with Duffy. It looks to be Lucite.

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i think we are all right except for the green color its yellow it turns when using chrome polish, chrome polish is easy and cheap and works just fine to do the test plus it actually cleans and preserves the bakelite,and dont ruin an item by using a hot pin, thats just damages it, this is from a site online ref below,,bj

Ways to Test Bakelite for Authenticity

While you'll never use the hot pin test to determine Bakelite authenticity, since some older plastics (like celluloid) are flammable and a hot pin can be dangerous to not only the plastic but to you as well, don't worry. There are many other ways to test Bakelite that are much safer and several of them only require your senses to accomplish. It's good to employ more than one of these tests until you get very comfortable identifying Bakelite.

1. Testing by Sound

Listen for the "clunk" when two pieces of Bakelite are tapped together. This very distinctive sound is often heard when two or more Bakelite bangles are worn at the same time. Try tapping two pieces of another type of plastic together, and compare the sound to two pieces of true Bakelite the next time you're out shopping where Bakelite is on display.

2. Testing by Feel

Consider the weight of a piece of plastic, especially jewelry. Bakelite feels heavier, more dense when compared to other types of plastics. Hold another piece of plastic in one hand, and a piece of Bakelite of approximately the same size in the other. You'll notice the heavier feel of the Bakelite.

3. Testing by Smell

Rub the item in question vigorously with your thumb until you feel the plastic heat up. Then, before it cools, take a whiff. A distinct chemical odor similar to formaldehyde will linger with most genuine Bakelite. This often takes a bit of practice. Some noses find better results when the piece of plastic is placed under hot running tap water before sniffing it. This test works well with Bakelite bangle bracelets.

4. Testing by Sight - Inspect the Piece Closely

Look for wear scratches and patina that new pieces of plastic don't normally exhibit. Also look for tiny chips on the edges of carving. Examine the piece with a jeweler's loupe or another type of magnifyer, if needed. Generally, an old piece of Bakelite will not be free of some minor scratching and wear, even though it is in excellent condition by a collector's standards.

5. Testing by Sight - Using Simichrome Polish

Simichrome Polish is a non-abrasive cream used to clean metals. You can also use it to test Bakelite for authenticity. Sparingly apply to a soft cloth and gently rub a small spot on the inside or back of the item being tested. If it's Bakelite, the cloth should turn yellow with ease. If a piece is laquered, it may test negative. Black Bakelite pieces often fail this test as well. Use the other tests above to confirm authenticity if a piece you suspect to be Bakelite fails with Simichrome.

6. Testing by Sight - Using Formula 409 Cleaner

Scrubbing Bubbles was once the standard cleaner to use for Bakelite testing, but experts now recommend Formula 409 instead. To use, dampen a cotton swab with 409 and rub it gently on the inside of the item being tested. If it's Bakelite, the swab will turn yellow. If a piece is laquered, it may test negative with 409. Black Bakelite pieces often fail this test as well. Use the other tests above to confirm authenticity if a piece you suspect to be Bakelite fails with 409.

REF

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