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Chocolate Cow


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They are brown based (varying shades) with black ribbons. Vacor made one that is sometimes condused for a Pelt, and they often have thinner stripes and look more like a Miller type. If you google image "peltier chocholate cow" there are a variety of good examples (and a few that are not Cows).

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many are lighter based almost showing orange in alot of examples that are considered " cows " by some. dark, chocolaty, with black ribbons, soaked in av. ..... this is the only dark base i have. rest are of the lighter side ... bill

post-75-0-22363900-1409009928_thumb.jpg

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Thanks everyone! Mibcapper, those are beauties!!!!

Here are the two I have in question......

IMG 1788 (1280x640)

The one on the left I always assumed was vacor.... until I saw the pics above. The one on the right is a very light brown base, but is definitely not white base.
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Are you sure, mon ? Peltier black glass is especially susceptible to turning iridescent when buried, and that's what it looks like from here.

(Peltier clear glass often turns iridescent, also.

In the 1930's some of Peltier's glass formulas had a good percentage of recycled bottle cullet in the batch mix, and as a bottle digger, I wonder if that had anything to do with the iridescence on some colors.)

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I have seen similar on quite a few dug Alleys, in a variety of colors. On those marbles, it does not seem to be associated with aventurine - more like a chemical reaction with some colorant in the glass. I do not think I have seen it on white or clear.

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I have seen similar on quite a few dug Alleys, in a variety of colors. On those marbles, it does not seem to be associated with aventurine - more like a chemical reaction with some colorant in the glass. I do not think I have seen it on white or clear.

I've seen it on Alleys too. But (so far) only on dark colors, and not in association with aventurine . . .

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This is a sheen all of its own found on heavy aventurine on dug Pelts from the Ottawa site. It can look like heavy metallic on some of the thick aventurine. There is some lighter less metallic coating on some other dug marbles but this is pretty exclusive to the heavy aventurine striping on dug from Ottawa Peltiers.

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"pretty exclusive" . . . Do any dug Peltiers without AV show it? I think only a chemical analysis would convince me it's any different than the similar "abalone", "metallic sheen", or "irridesence", or whatever you want to call it, that I've seen on other dug marbles. It's definitely not worth arguing about though, that's for sure. Here's a variety ranging from "sheen" to "metal"

Ric540_zps27d3198f.jpg

Sorry for the crappy pic.

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I have a few hundred or thousand dug Alleys that have the same looking thing and none of them have any aventurine or it on any aventurine. From mine and others samples the Alley color that seems to have this the most often is the lghter blue and red second. It seems to always follow the swirl pattern.

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It sure seems like it is a product of a chemical in the glass (maybe one or more colorants) and particular soil conditions, perhaps pH, or some other chemical in the soil. The particular environment of the soil and/or the time the marble has in contact with it might explain the variations.

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Ric, yes I believe it is a combo of both soil and glass composition. Having been a bottle digger for years I am very familiar with the type of iridescence that is often formed on buried glass. The metallic iridescence I have seen on the aventurine striping of old dug Pelts looks like a slightly different critter to me? But it seems that may just be me :)

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It sure seems like it is a product of a chemical in the glass (maybe one or more colorants) and particular soil conditions, perhaps pH, or some other chemical in the soil. The particular environment of the soil and/or the time the marble has in contact with it might explain the variations.

What he ^^^ says.

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