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J_Ding
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This one, at 0.64" on a transparent cranberry base, might be a CAC, based on the glass, ram's horns and the straight seams. The other possibility is German. If you have photos of another like it, please post. Would like to see another example. Thanks! John

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Here're some German slags,that I found in Holland and Germany.

It shows the variety of this slag type.

Sometimes I wonder if I find this kind of marble here in Europe,wether it is self-evident German,and not American LOL.

In general,the white stripes of the German slags are slightly tighter,but thats not always the case.

I would think your marble is German.

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The cut line of the cranberry one is a little questionable, but I've found that a high percentage of CAC slags are "one-sided," like the one in question. Can't say the same about the Germans -- at least in my experience. The white is fairly evenly distributed, like Winnie's examples show. And the side view of the cranberry one looks more CAC than Euro, although now we know that's not necessarily a distinguishing CAC feature.

Winnie, I agree about the white in the Germans generally being more in tight bands than is seen in CAC slags -- and that wide swaths of white on the surface (like on the cranberry slag) are less common on Germans than they are on CACs.

Stayin' with CAC, for now.

But this ain't a hill I want to die on, as they say.

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This is great discussion, and some excellent examples to fill the mental hard-drive. I rather like a back and forth tennis match over the ID of a mib. The clarity of the glass, while not clear in the pictures above, is quite remarkable. Keep the debate going! So far, it seems a draw.

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I posted another example of an amber two seam slag on another thread on this site, so as to not confuse the discussion. It doesn't have wide swaths of white as mentioned above, but does has a north pole bias to the colorant, and one half does not show it. Swing over to that thread and let me know what you think!

John

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Good to know,so a slag with open seam is almost certainly German.

I've noticed another thing about the German ones,when thet have open seams,they often have a lesser quality glass,and the stripng is almost all on the surface.

It seems to me,there are two different types of German slags,perhaps they are made in different places and/ or a different time.

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I've noticed another thing about the German ones,when thet have open seams,they often have a lesser quality glass,and the stripng is almost all on the surface.

It seems to me,there are two different types of German slags,perhaps they are made in different places and/ or a different time.

I agree, Winnie -- The German slags I have that have the paler colors are usually more damaged (usually tiny chips or pocks), also indicating a lesser quality glass. Maybe a cost-cutting measure, therefore a slightly later time period?

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