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Another interesting Pelt...


Vancecrash
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Aaah, I'm an bottle hound myself. Although I have never been in water looking for them. I spent an entire summer digging in a glass pit in an old Oklahoma car wrecking yard. I found some fun glass in there. Sadly most of the greats were in shards. I do have some old Bayer asprin bottles, some tonics, couple snake oils, and one of my favs included here. I found d this bottle in a mason jar with no lid, 3 ft down in the pit. How on Earth did it stay in such condition?

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amazing condition really considering it was probably in the ground for 80 + years  guess it was protected by the jar some how and stayed dry  

staying dry is the key with labels if they get wet the label basically turns to liquid and when you dig them the image is still there but the paper is dissolved  looks like paint and just wipes off seen that with 150 160 year old bottles straight out the ground

Ive found a few USA bottles here the Ayers sarsaparilla`s and the Aussie version of the Warner safe cure and the new York Vaseline is common me an the daughter have a pretty good general collection between us

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Pretty cool to still have some contents actually the bottle is a an amazing survivor considering

 would love to see some of the stuff you have found, 

Down here we used different patents for our carbonated drinks  1873 an English chap by the name of Hiram Codd patented a tool that created a groove inside the lip of the bottle prior to his patent tool it was near impossible to get the groove the same on every bottle in that groove he place a rubber washer inside the neck he put a marble  the bottle was filled upside down when the bottle was removed from the filler the marble would fall against the washer and the pressure of the soda would keep the marble against the washer so sealing the bottle to open the bottle you just simply pushed the marble down into the neck breaking the seal these codd bottle`s were used in all of England`s colony's the bottle was expensive to buy so the owners embossed them so they could identify they were theirs and there was many a court battle over cordial makers using bottles that weren't theirs 

Here are some of my girls bottle`s all 6/7 oz  some i dug some i bought far right still has the washer,  the tops were put on after the marble was put in,  these 5 were handmade blown in a mold by mouth 2 have there tops put on by machine ( Spun ) 3 are applied tops   i lovingly refer to this picture as some Australian lions 😉

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Those are amazing. The concept is brilliant, and seeing it in this picture, clearly it was executed just as brilliantly.

I have some hand blown glass vessels that came to my hand filled with marbles from auction. I keep the ones I really enjoy and gift the rest. People really enjoy receiving fun glass randomly gifted. Usually anyway. These are a few bottle I happen have sitting by me. The first is a vase clearly, but I suspect as handmade, but probably amateur hand made? The second is a bottle I really like. The pitcher jug is hand made for sure, and by someone with skill. The third is just and anchor hocking made juice bottle, but I like the offset nature of the top. It's a beautifully made industry bottle.

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Can see why you like them mate

and think you might be right with the first one can just imagine a little bunch of daisy in there, very much dig the second one she got some style would be a great little condiment on the dinner table love the little pouring lip the third one is cool never seen on off set like that we have a similar one down here with the ribbing that was a fruit cordial concentrate from around the 40s /50s  very cool

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We had a similar situation with bottle reuse here in the USA shortly after prohibition was repealed. In 1935 the government required liquor bottles to be cast with the phrase, "federal law forbids the sale or reuse of this bottle". There were even localized laws surrounding destruction of empty bottles. Some areas strictly enforced these laws even. I'm certain the liquor industry lobbied hard to enact this law to prevent bootleggers from taking a bite out of thier recently re-established profits.

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