Jump to content
Noodleloaf

Green brick?

Recommended Posts

That's a beauty.

 

21 hours ago, I'llhavethat1 said:

Nice marble

You agree on green brick, yes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Steph said:

You agree on green brick, yes?

Looks like it could be.  Some more detailed pics, size, etc. would help rule out some of the other possibilities. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Encouraging to see the cutline on there, rather than a Bulgarian pontil, lol.

It's a nice marble no doubt.  Either the glass looks newer or the super-mint surface reflecting the white is what throws me of a bit. Might be able to tell better in person.  

Somebody did a pretty good post on Bricks a couple years ago, green bricks etc.    I'll post the link if I can find it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, transparent green base as far as I can see.  I did find some discussions on other forums about these.  I have to ask since it sounds like some are darker - I know there are MFC white bricks and black bricks and the look is quite different depending.  Could there also be MFC white green bricks and black green bricks?  Personally, I really love the ratio of oxblood to green and white in mine.  I can see why people rarely part with these!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The green is, from memory, just a different oxidization state of the copper that makes oxblood look the way it does... normally as a red opaque.  Black/ox and white/ox are really the primary mixes but there is a big range in variation for end result to the eye.

Typically on a "green brick" yes the green is much darker and can look black until backlit in just the right way.  This is because the normal opaque oxblood does a great job interfering with transparency unless it happens to be very thin and at the surface as yours is.

It is also possible to have lavender and blue in the mix with oxblood tracing the gather pattern (both very rare) and incidental oxblood in aquas which tends to be at the shear rather than throughout.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...