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If you look at the blue, yellow & green corkscrew marble in my "smiles" photos in the gallery, it doesn't up show well  there, but it has a matt finish. There are no dings or  chips that show wear. I got several others with matt finishes, in the same jar- were they made that way, why, &, if so who made them? Bonnie.

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O.K., so I guess I have to get a better camera than my cell phone. I thought maybe others had run into matt finishes & had a fast answer, like a dirt chemical or something. It's just I like my corkscrew a lot & it stands out so from the others that I feel sorry for it. (As you see, I personalize my "stuff") Thanks for the try, Bonnie

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Matt finishes sometimes come from spending time in water, such as in an aquarium.  

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Very few marble companies made marbles with a flat or matt finish. If they did the marbles were more likely game marbles or industrial marbles. I am sure that 95-99% of all play marbles were a gloss shiny finish. No reason the kids would want a flat finish rather than a gloss finish. Your marbles probably have what most refer to as pocket ware.  Pocket ware is not a hit, chip, sparkle, or moon. Pocket ware is just ware from being handled rolled around with other marbles. Roll or rub two pieces of most glass together for enough time and the glass objects will grind against each other and this grinding will take the shine off . It is a more even all over grind than I hit or chip etc.in one localized spot. The hits which cause sparkles, moons and chips are much harder impact and in one spot. Pocket ware Is slighter abrasion all over the surface of the marble. Pocket ware is very common with vintage or old marbles. You will not see big numbers of Jabo marbles with pocket ware. Because they are new enough that most have not had years and years of rubbing together.  A three head marble polishing machine can bring most pocket ware marbles back to mint with only a final polish or buff. But If you can find someone to do it, it may cost $2- $3 or $5.00 each to get this done. Add that plus shipping etc. to the normal market value and only few machine made marbles are worth the effort time and cost to polish or buff.  Most all veneered marbles(later MK- later Vitro - others) are not a candidate for polishing or even a buff. The colors are thin on the surface and to much color will be removed by polishing or buffing.  You have marbles with normal pocket ware, Light damage, but all over the surface of the entire marble. Most collectors shy away from marbles with pocket ware. Condition, condition, number 1.  

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Thankyou so much. I'm reading all the comments all of you have written in the forums, etc., & am learning so much, I have a sweet green slag with the same finish along with some others. Most of the marbles in my  photos came together in the same jar, along with a mans name & the date 1976. I feel he was a collector & will keep his collection intact & learn as much as I can through them. Of course I'm adding my own, who can resist the hunt of a new marble! Bonnie

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Sometimes they just need a good cleaning.  I use an eyeglass cleaner called Zipwax. Just roll the marble around  in it, work it with your fingers, then wipe it clean with a micro fiber cloth. I just did a couple of blue slags, is what made me think of it. They both went from pretty dull to pretty nice.  Does not always work, but when it does the results can be remarkable. 

Bruce

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9 hours ago, Berryb said:

Sometimes they just need a good cleaning.  I use an eyeglass cleaner called Zipwax. Just roll the marble around  in it, work it with your fingers, then wipe it clean with a micro fiber cloth. I just did a couple of blue slags, is what made me think of it. They both went from pretty dull to pretty nice.  Does not always work, but when it does the results can be remarkable. 

Bruce

Zipwax makes glass "look" better because it adds a coating that fills in scratches, disguising them.

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So it works then. If zipwax is a problem I expect windex or any other glass cleaner or eyeglass spray would work. All I'm sayin' is there is often 50, 75, or more years of crud built up that should come off.

Bruce

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