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what are these 2 called?


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I've been culling my collection over the past few years and updating my will--sorry if this seems too macabre in this forum--because I'm leaving my best marbles to my son.  As well, I'm trying to re-measure and reevaluate each one, then make sure the map of my case is accurate with descriptions.  Here are 2 I've forgotten, so if you know what they should be called, please help.  The green/orange one is very unusual; I don't think I've seen one like it.  The green/yellow one came from an ebay auction and I think it was called a transitional.  You can see the melted pontil, which is quite rough.  (It also may have been one of Alan Basinet's last auctions.)  These are both in the normal 5/8 plus or minus range. Thanks in advance for your expertise.  

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Wow.  

They look really nice and unusual.   I want the first to be Christensen, but going back to maybe Leighton on the second.  

@I'llhavethat1 ... any thoughts?   Am I just making stuff up?

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Hi VT, good to see you around.  And thanks Steph for thinking of me.  Headscratchers for sure.  Can't comment much on the 1st other than to say the orange is rich and the cutline is huge.  CAC experts can chime in from there.

2nd one could benefit from a better pic of the pontil.  Faceted would lean towards German.  The  green base would be unusual.  what I've seen on a German.

The 9 is tight 

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Hey Andrea, good to see your handle on a post again, it’s been a long time! Glad to “see” you again. I’m with Galen, these old eyes could use better views, especially of the pontil on the second one - I think it’s most likely an American transitional not German though. 

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The yellow glass used in the hand gathered example is lead antimonate or lead stanate based and would indicate a mid 19th century or earlier manufacturing date. Probably German. Later yellows are cadmium sulphide based and have a different look to them.

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Good to know, Brian, thanks! 
 

Question - by different, could you describe or show how? Or is it the more orange of the other example? 
 

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