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ID Help - Akro Blue Oxblood?


BENgineer
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8 hours ago, Jeff54 said:

Non si può tralasciare, di conseguenza, la formula per il sangue di bue in biglie giocattolo acquisita da MFC, proveniva dalla Germania.

    Sono riuscito a recuperare questa vecchia foto di un Blue Oxblood. Il sangue di bue, il colore, ha migliaia di anni. Da ceramica, vetro, vernice, abbigliamento, lo chiami. Nelle biglie giocattolo, quella tedesca, essendo la prima, immagino, l'IMO ha ottenuto il meglio. Forse per coloranti così belli, temperature, materie prime, qualunque sistema per realizzare il loro vetro. Definito nella storia della Germania; "Tutte le loro biglie di vetro raccolte a mano sono "imitazione agata"." Accreditato anche: Greiner, Vetter's Sohn. Peccato solo che questo esempio sia stato giocato con una vecchia foto perché l'Oxblood rivela la sua potenza con maggiore chiarezza. 

Indipendentemente da ciò, il lignaggio inizia qui:

 

324998826_Vetters-Sohn-Blue-Ox.jpg.d311429b4725eb4f2671f0e46c5cca4a.jpg

This is a beautiful and important photo!  👍🏻

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Long trip for Chuck(cheese)from GA.  One tired man at the end of each long day. But well worth the expense and time. These chances have almost vanished. Most old factory sites,95% of them are empty, under new concrete, buried really deep, etc.   Some days you find the mibs, some days you don't find them.  Not every day or even once a year is a full bucket a day. But a FEW times in 25 years of digging, several full buckets in a day.  

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1 hour ago, wvrons said:

Long trip for Chuck(cheese)from GA.  One tired man at the end of each long day. But well worth the expense and time. These chances have almost vanished. Most old factory sites,95% of them are empty, under new concrete, buried really deep, etc.   Some days you find the mibs, some days you don't find them.  Not every day or even once a year is a full bucket a day. But a FEW times in 25 years of digging, several full buckets in a day.  

I just turned on my brother in law's Uncle Jim too the Heaton Marble Dig video only a couple of hours ago...can't remember when I saw a 75 year old man get so excited! Especially the part when the "honey hole" got tapped!

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14 hours ago, wvrons said:

Long trip for Chuck(cheese)from GA.  One tired man at the end of each long day. But well worth the expense and time. These chances have almost vanished. Most old factory sites,95% of them are empty, under new concrete, buried really deep, etc.   Some days you find the mibs, some days you don't find them.  Not every day or even once a year is a full bucket a day. But a FEW times in 25 years of digging, several full buckets in a day.  

Wow. These stories bring to mind something someone said to me long ago that has stuck with me ever since: "It's great stuff when life gives you something fantastic to be tired from!"  This sure ranks at the top!

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I dug steady for two days straight from daylight to dark. I bet I dug a half a million marbles out of that hole. Maybe more, shoveling them into many other diggers buckets. David Tamulevich had the hole started and dug it until he had enough and I took over. The hole was only big enough for one until it got so deep it caved in, then we got another person in there.   I was happily tired, blew out my blue jeans, dirty, and hungry. Probably dehydrated too, I wouldn't stop to eat or drink much. That's time wasted when you're on marble factory dirt. Every now and then I'd get out of the hole and check on my dogs (I pulled my camper to the site because I had my dogs and nobody to take care of them while we were in WV) and I'd dump some buckets into the big box in the back of my truck you see in Ron's pics, get a bottled water, and get back to the hole. Someone else would dig it while I did that but by the time I got back they usually had enough and was ready for me to jump back in lol. I always said I don't like to operate a shovel but in that case I loved every minute of it.

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@Steph, I strongly cast my vote for this thread too be saved, or Archived, and not lost in the shuffle. Definitely worthy as it supports unforgettable moments in time and the knowledge share from old collectors too new ones. 👍

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15 minutes ago, William said:

@Steph, I strongly cast my vote for this thread too be saved, or Archived, and not lost in the shuffle. Definitely worthy as it supports unforgettable moments in time and the knowledge share from old collectors too new ones. 👍

Yes!  I have already,  several days ago, created a seperate link to this thread and placed it on the Archives page.

 

Screenshot_20220827_092433_Firefox.jpg

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9 minutes ago, chicagocyclist said:

Yes!  I have already,  several days ago, created a seperate link to this thread and placed it on the Archives page.

 

Screenshot_20220827_092433_Firefox.jpg

Nice...didn't catch it, haven't been home much too actually sit and take everything in on the boards. Glad it's there 👍

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I just wanted to also update everyone that I had several reputable sources say this is an Akro Oxblood Patch marble and not a Blue Oxblood. 

 

Also, I really enjoy reading the stories and seeing all of the photos! These are stories that will now forever be heard and help future like-minded marble goers. Thank you all for sharing and helping me!

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Here is a Blueblood . . .

Ric343.jpg

The oxblood is under blue and if you don't light it up good and look look closely it can look like a dark blue corkscrew.

Edited by Ric
Corrected name from "Blue Oxblood" to "Blueblood"
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10 minutes ago, Ric said:

Here is a Blue Oxblood . . .

Ric343.jpg

The oxblood is under blue and if you don't light it up good and look look closely it can look like a dark blue corkscrew.

I thought if the oxblood was over blue it was a blueblood? Just from what I've read, keep in mind I'm under 2 weeks into marbles.

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1 hour ago, BENgineer said:

I just wanted to also update everyone that I had several reputable sources say this is an Akro Oxblood Patch marble and not a Blue Oxblood. 

 

Also, I really enjoy reading the stories and seeing all of the photos! These are stories that will now forever be heard and help future like-minded marble goers. Thank you all for sharing and helping me!

I think there may have just been a little confusion here. The red on the OP is oxblood.  The blue is blue color glass.   I was misreading the original question, sorry for making that assumption.  It is not blue oxblood but it is red oxblood on a marble that also has blue on it.  So it is an Akro patch with oxblood and not an Akro Blue Oxblood   IMO.

 

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15 minutes ago, BENgineer said:

I thought if the oxblood was over blue it was a blueblood? Just from what I've read, keep in mind I'm under 2 weeks into marbles.

The ones I have and have seen have the oxblood under blue. If it was on top of the blue, I don't think it would be so hard to see.

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24 minutes ago, BENgineer said:

I thought if the oxblood was over blue it was a blueblood? Just from what I've read, keep in mind I'm under 2 weeks into marbles.

Now that I think about it, Chad's marble is the Blue Oxblood, the one I posted (and @I'llhavethat1 is talking about, I think) is called a Blueblood - sorry for the confusion!

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Here's the Tricolor Agates box which came into the discussion on Facebook.   From a Morphy auction, but through a different website, so I couldn't get a bigger photo in my brief attempt. 

Tricolor_Morphy.jpg


And here's a similar more patchy one that I have. 


Tricolor_BlueOxblood_600.jpg




And my apologies to Ben for being so late in getting to this thread.  ^_^  Thanks for the tag, @William  :) 

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I have read and heard several times that oxblood is confusing to newbies. Well now I can understand why. How can you have Blue Oxblood? Oxblood is blood red so it's supposed to be the color of blood: red.  I've never seen blue blood and then purple oxblood and then other color oxblood?

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