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"children In A Candy Store" An Excerpt From My Book


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Children in a Candy Store

Of the many personality types seen in children in a candy store, two stand out. One type of child will share all of his candies with anyone, even to the point of not having any for himself. David McCullough reminds me of this personality type. Go to his factory and you will come away with a pocketful of marbles. Many people have received his small sample boxes of marbles from the latest runs. In fact, when I was in Sistersville and I ran out of marbles that I give away to children, young and old, David gave me a whole box of free marbles to pass out to the crowds during the local marble festival.

Then there are the children that will take all of your candy and eat all of their own, too. This type of child will steal or destroy or bully others until the candy is all gone. You will see this type of child, now taller but not grown-up, in the marble world. I’m sure you have run into this type of person at any one the shows or on any of the chat boards. You will recognize this person because he is trying to sell you a polished marble, or he will make a replica of an antique marble and not sign it, or tell untruths on the chat boards knowing full well that they are lies but who can prove it?

Unfortunately, you will also find this type of person at the marble factory.

In one of the runs, an altercation took place because one of the Patrons had filled his pockets, socks and mouth with all the marbles he could steal as they cooled. In another run, after David gave a group some glass from his own stockpile was accused of stealing their glass. The same group, during another run, told the world on a chat board that they used glass that even David McCullough could not get. In fact, David sent them to his own glass broker who was told to take David’s private stockpile.

The biggest problem that these personality types create is when they think that they are better marble makers than a man who has worked in the business for thirty years. These people have all sorts of ideas about how to make marbles and it never once crosses their mind to consult with David about the expected outcome which they have no idea how to attain.

When David sets the tank in the back, a beautiful run can be expected by the Patrons. The workers at the factory such as Johnny Carr will guard the back of the tank like a bulldog. But, that didn’t stop some Patrons thinking that they knew better. Despite the warnings, and despite the dark marbles already made on the last run, some Patrons still threw aventurine or other glasses into the back of the tank. It doesn’t take long for the marbles to turn dark. It does take a long time for David to get the set of the tank right again, if, in fact, he can, and for pretty marbles to come out again. One of the reasons for the great success of the Tributes three runs is that David has been left in charge. He was left in charge of what glass to buy and what to start with and how to set the tank. The blushes, the oxbloods and the swatches of aventurine in marbles such as Hard Core, Colonel, WVRon, and Arizona are evidence of David’s excellence when left in charge.

So next time you go to a candy store or a marble factory, act like the sharing child.

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My Joseph loved the children in a candy store part. He read it and when his mother came home he asked her to read it. Remember that piece of writing "Everything I Needed to Know I Learned in Kindergarten"? That's when most people learned to practice that concept and perfect it. Joseph got it. I bet Lou's 10 year old got it too. Edna

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My Joseph loved the children in a candy store part. He read it and when his mother came home he asked her to read it. Remember that piece of writing "Everything I Needed to Know I Learned in Kindergarten"? That's when most people learned to practice that concept and perfect it. Joseph got it. I bet Lou's 10 year old got it too. Edna

Joseph can read and is very perceptive.

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