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Banded latticino?


sclsu
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I got a bunch of handmades so I was reading up on them, and I am unsure if this would be considered a banded latticino. Yellow lattice core with alternating white and orange ribbons encircling it, with just a small gap between them. Is that a banded latticino? 

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I suppose the description fits, but the outer decoration of a "core" marble (latticinio core, solid core, ribbon core, etc.) is not usually a part of the title / description -- with the exception of the term "naked," which is used when there are no outer bands.

If it had no core, I would call it a "banded transparent."  But since it does, I would simply call it a "yellow-latticinio core."  Others may disagree.

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Ann, I was referring more to the white and orange ribbons, not the ones on the surface. I was reading that a banded latticino had a lattice and then ribbons surrounding the inner core, with a third layer of ribbons outside of the core. These types are supposed rarer than a regular latticino 

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Collecting antique marbles second edition. Block doesn't go that in depth on handmades, and I was reading, and looking at my new marbles, and wondering what that type was exactly, because the pics in that book aren't super close up

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The very best book on antique marbles is by Paul Baumann.  Clearly written by the expert who pretty much came up with the classification system most people use today.  And the photographs are excellent.  I recommend it highly.

 

The term "banded," for example, is only used for surface ribbons or threads of color -- not ones in the interior, like the orange and white.

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Yup -- check it out.  There are some doozies in there!  And a great series of photos of a contemporary glass artist "building" and then making cane-cut marbles.

He also has some good info on percentages . . . for example, out of (say) 300 latticinio marbles, 80% will be white, 15% yellow, and the rest (only 5%) alternating yellow and white or other colors (red, orange, red & white, blue, etc.).  Gives you a good sense of what is rare and what is not.

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looks like whatever it was intended to be didn't quite come together in the first pic (might be close to an end of cane or thereabouts at that pole) what's the size?.  Nice odd-ball.  I'd prefer to see a bit more definition or symmetry to the pattern before trying to categorize much more than that.  Cheers :)

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