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Steph

Word Of The Day ... Or Week Or Whatever

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As you yourself mentioned recently, 'Father Knows Best'! :lol:

And that was a pretty interesting television show to bring up in the other discussion.

I think a lot of us would lump it into the category of 'those neat old 60's sit-coms'.

But the actual 1954-1960 time period clearly puts it in 'The Fifties'.

But somehow, for me, it feels more like a 60's show.

I think it was a little ahead of its time in terms of 'the style' of

network programming that we'd see in the first half of the next decade.

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pedalo

dingo

fordo

^^ My Scrabble opponent and I played those three words in a row today. So many words ending in O. Not easy to think of.

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Why is "renown" spelled without a K?

I thought I had a great scrabble word -- REKNOWN and it was wrong.

Renown is being known .... so why no K?

Pffffllllllll

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Ha! Thanks for the 'nucklehead'!

Mondays are always bad for me for several reasons.

Even worse than for most people. And Garfield.

It was my first laugh all day.

Okay, I didn't see it until a little after midnight, but since I

hadn't gone to bed yet it still counts! ( :

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Pretty much I also thought this renown is being known as Steph pointed out. So I had a glance to http://dict.leo.org and look :o

renown = fame / reputation

but

being known = best-known, well-known

So this looks for me like a different meaning and might be the cause why there is no 'k' in renown. It is just a different word and meaning, or am I getting meschugge? :dunno:

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:)



renown (n.) dictionary.gif

c. 1300, from Anglo-French renoun, Old French renon "renown, fame, reputation," from renomer "make famous," from re- "repeatedly" (see re-) + nomer"to name," from Latin nominare "to name" (see nominate). The Middle English verb reknouen "make known, acknowledge" has been assimilated to the noun via renowned. In old German university slang, a reknowner (German renommist) was "a boaster, a swaggerer."

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=renown






know (v.) dictionary.gif

Old English cnawan (class VII strong verb; past tense cneow, past participle cnawen), "to know, perceive; acknowledge, declare," from Proto-Germanic*knew- (cognates: Old High German bi-chnaan, ir-chnaan "to know"), from PIE root *gno- "to know" (cognates: Old Persian xšnasatiy "he shall know;" Old Church Slavonic znati, Russian znat "to know;" Latin gnoscere; Greek *gno-, as in gignoskein; Sanskrit jna- "know"). Once widespread in Germanic, this form is now retained only in English, where however it has widespread application, covering meanings that require two or more verbs in other languages (such as German wissen, kennen, erkennen and in part können; French connaître, savoir; Latin novisse, cognoscere; Old Church Slavonic znaja, vemi). The Anglo-Saxons used two distinct words for this, witan (see wit) and cnawan.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=know

Does that mean not related?

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Does that mean not related?

Your research yields pretty much what the dictionary told me. Nice to read how the words evolve from which languages.

But I do not get the idea behind your question.

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I still can't tell if it's just a coincidence that the words have some similarity of sound and meaning.

Did they have unrelated linguistic origins?

Or is there still a relation but it wasn't made clear in those two entries?

.... Or was it clear and I just missed it?

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Hi, I think the linguistic origins are not related to each other - unless you omit their roots reaching back to the grunting of the cavemen thousands of years ago :rolleyes:

Similarity in sound not necessarily means similar meaning. I just think of 'laugh' and 'love'.

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"brin" and "panache"

Those are parts of fans. The brin is one of the radiating inner sticks of a paper folding fan. Still having a bit of trouble picturing which part of the fan is the "panache".

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I can't even begin to think about fans without taking a couple days off.

Have been thinking about 'renown' for two weeks and my brain is tired.

But today I think I finally 'got it'. It's pretty simple, but the path to it required

adopting a temporary total disregard toward things like nouns, verbs, and

other forms, and just sensing the 'feelings' of words. This is hard.

And sure, they're related.

Let's start my hypothesis with a different word. Reproduction.

Not the thing that's going on when biblical people 'know' each other and start all that 'begatting'. ;)

I'm talking about something like the Mona Lisa print you might have in your living room.

The original was 'produced'. Subsequent copies have been 'reproduced', and like quite a few other

're-' words, there's a subtle implication that there're probably a lot of them out there.

'Renown' is simply 're' + 'known' with the 'k' left out.

When a person is born, he becomes 'known', in the sense that he 'exists'.

From that point on, every time someone new meets him or becomes aware of his existence, he's

effectively re-known. One achieves 'renown' when this happens more often than average.

I don't know. Sounds pretty good to me. ( :

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Hi,

since I am nosy about "panache" I tried to find out which part of a fan it could be. I have no glue. Even wikipedia does not use this word: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hand_fan

Maybe it is the art that is printed or painted on the fan? I do not know.

HAPPY NEW YEAR (at least in germany we are already in 2016)

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