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When Were Lutz Marbles Introduced? Has There Been A Consensus?


Steph
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I was just skimming through the 1883 Robert's article, "Marbles and Where They Come From", and saw a reference to "gilded and silvered marbles".

Of late years gilded and silvered marbles have been introduced ....

I don't remember registering that sentence before. 1883 struck me as earlier than I last remembered seeing lutz mentioned. But obviously I'm not sure.

Almost every time I go back to the old sources I pick up something new. Why don't I do it more often? lol

p.s. ... what might the "silvered marbles" be? That's not ringing a bell.

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Maybe so.

There was an illustration of mica, captioned as "snow-flake". I didn't see snow-flakes mentioned in the text of the article, so maybe that's what silvered referred to.

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Someone recently mentioned Baumann's book placing them in a very short period in the early 20th century. I was surprised, so I checked, and sure enough that's what he said, although I'd have to look again to get the exact (suggested) dates . . . somewhere around 1910-1920, I think, offhand; he believes they may have been made for only 6 years or so, which (along with WWI) could account for their rarity, in comparison with latticinios, solid cores, etc. The Venetians had the monopoly on what we call lutz for a loooong time . . .

"Maybe "gilded" refers to those chinas with gold bulls-eyes that were in a recent thread? And the few Benningtons with gold?

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That's what I was wondering . . . I think it's possible that there might have been chinas or bennies with silver as well as gold, but because silver tarnishes (and easily wears) we just might not be seeing it . . .

(I'm assuming the silver -- if it was done -- was applied like the gold on the chinas & bennies, as Edna suggested -- painted on, then fired again?)

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I believe Baumann relied on a lot of hearsay and assumption as that was what was available at the time. A lot of mint original German packaging has been found. I believe a bit of investigation as to when those certain marble makers were in business may help date some of the marbles. As do some of the adds that have been found.

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Guest browse4antiques

If I remember right, Baumann said not until 1925 for lutz. Anyway, they are all "regular pontil" which places them in the later period of handmades. ... Roger

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And I believe the pertinent (late) ads were posted here recently in another thread, along with an undated (but from the 1920s) brochure . . .

And I have to say, Baumann is one of the very few marble historians who did NOT rely mainly on heresay and assumption. Unlike many others.

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