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Mfc Vaseline


chucks_mibs
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Thats a very nice slag you have there! Check closely though, and the one in my avatar is backwards, it spins counterclockwise. This is the only one I've found so far...I guess it was a fluke? The shear is 9/16" long and dead straight, the marble is 5/8". I am fairly certain its MFC.

Chuck's vaseline has a nice long shear you can see in the second to last photo. If it was a transitional it would be shorter or more curved up or spidered and messy.

-Brad

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Looks good, haven't seen that 9 pattern so well defined on vaseline glass. Other marbles shown are pretty nice too. What's to stop someone from taking a picture, reversing the image, and ..? I've been thinking about so many 6's and 9's that I grabbed a piece of paper and had to scribble a couple in reverse to compare how they're really supposed to look. No, wait... that's backwards (or is it?)

post-265-1181781609_thumb.jpg

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I heard or read something about reverse handgathereds...........it said something about back in the day perhaps it was politically incorrect to be "left handed" ....therfore that could be one of the factors that very few "reverse twists" were made.....anyone heard or read anything of the sort?

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Guest browse4antiques

The top (yellow) marble is for sure a "crease-pontil" transitional, that is made by the same people who made the color-based ones, likely Canadian. The pattern is perfect for that type of marble, and the cutoff, or crease, is just exactly typical of "crease-pontils" - and, of course they did definitely make yellow. The purple looks like it could be too, but I can't see the crease well enough to be certain. (all great examples). ... Roger

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So has the blue one been flipped or are we looking at it as it appears? I'll take a photo with the brown next to a "normal" one tomorrow which should remove any doubt.

What does the seam on the yellow actually look like Chuck? Is there any spidering in the glass or is it fairly uniform and can you run a fingernail over it?

-Brad

Edit: I wrote a post over at LoM a ways back talking about left hand gathering. The recovered furnace piece from MFC had a groove worn into the right hand corner. This would only make sense if the marver was being spun against and into the right hand wall (clockwise) which would produce the "9" pattern everyone is so familiar with.

You can see photos of what I am talking about here: http://akronmarbles.com/mf_christensen_son_co.htm

If you match the brown stains on the zoomed portion it appears to be the right hand corner. Lefties are about 1 in 10. Historically they were taught to be right handed because left handedness was considered a sign of satanic influence. So you'd either have to beat the odds and have a lefty working there or have someone decide to mix it up. Horizontals seem to show the reverse bias for some reason, they were made by some extremely talented people thats for sure.

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Brad, I cant answer your question right now as the marble is packed away.....but as I remember, there were no groves whatsoever in the mib.....I have to go and pick up my daughter I'll be back in about an hour or so....and I'll pull the marble out for a thorough inspection .....and also some close-up pics

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Reverse gathered handmades are out there, and it could either be from the left hand... or just the right hand looking for a break from twisting clockwise all the time? Heck, I don't know

It makes sense that some machine mades could be running backwards by mistake. Cool article btw

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I see what I've missed about this vaseline...I should have been paying more attention to the white. Roger's right it is a transitional though in trying to figure out why he was calling it a "crease pontil" I realized he and I use completely different terminology.

Roger's page is here: http://members.kingston.net/browse/transpics/trans2.html

These are the definitions I go by: http://akronmarbles.com/pontil_variations.htm

Either way you go, you got a trans.

-Brad

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gallery_279_55_139.gif

Er, I mean, does the Akronmarbles site have a name for the kind of line Chuck's mib has?

(Yes, I'm feeling smart about seeing that Chuck's mib might have been transitional ... but not smart enough to follow what akronmarbles is saying about pontils versus shearmarks ... okay? Okay. ^_^)

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Hi Brad,

I forgot that page was still up. I should update it sometime. There has always been confusion about the terms "pinch" and "crease". When I first heard the term "pinch-pontil", it was being used with reference to the Japanese marbles, so I kept using it that way, and besides, the curved aspect of the Japanese "pinch-pontil" is sort of shaped the same as a thumb would make by pinching. I'd like to see your amber left-handed marble in-hand some day. Sometimes that type of marble was made with a very very wide 9, so that the entire top half of the marble is clear of the 9. Then sometimes a separate stream of striping glass emerges from the cutoff, and wraps around the marble moving upward around the marble and right to the top. The second strand always wraps in the opposite direction, giving the impression of a reverse 9. The clue to this type of construction is that the 9, in addition to being lefthanded, is that the 9 gets thinner towards the top. I have seen many that look initially to be lefthanded, but on careful examination, I have found the very wide primary right handed 9. I hope this makes sense, even if it may not apply to your marble. ... Roger

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I don't see shear marks on MFC marbles very often, and then they seem to be more like a fold in the glass without the spidering into the fold. Most MFC's that I have seen are completely smooth across the cutoff. ... Roger

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What it looks like in hand is a heavy concentration of opaque white near the lower middle portion of the marble. At the shear and at the handgather it goes to nearly full transparency. The line traces about 4 full circumferences around the marble either terminating or beginning at the shear. The shear is unusually deep and even produced divits at its ends in the surface of the marble. You can see one of these in the last photo I put up. More to come tomorrow, I still owe some comparison shots to prove its spinning the opposite direction.

-Brad

Edit: Just saw your other post Roger...like I said we seem to have completely different sets of terminology. In my opinion all MFC marbles have a shear mark. I guess we just call it different things.

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Dont go anywhere folks....Ive got some pics comming...The vaseline marble does have what looks like the crease shear mark on Rogers link. however, it is smooth on one side and a little rough on the other.....just as soon as I finish the pics, I will post for your viewing pleasure (30min.)

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Brad, Here's a pic of an example of what I mean about the secondary left-handed. In this marble you can see that what looks like a left-handed 9 at the top of the marble, is actually the tail wraping back from the bottom, and there is a very wide, right handed 9. On mine its easy to see, but on some, the tail wraps right up to the top without wiggling. Anyway, its just something to watch for - I'm not saying that yours has that construction. And my example is a Japanese one - quite different from yours. On the other matter of shear-marks: If the marble is smooth , and it is just a transition of striping glass, I call it a "cutoff", but if the smoothness of the surface is disturbed with some spidering so that its not just like a cold-roll or a fold, then I call it a "pontil", because it is a mark left from the glass having been cut away, though I guess technically it is a "shear mark" if it is anything other than cane-cut. ... Roger

post-112-1181795115_thumb.jpg

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