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What Polishing Compound To Use


Kathy
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Hi

A while back. I asked for help with polishing/repairing marbles. I did buy the diamond polishing pads that were suggested. I got rid of the roughness, but then the marbles were cloudy. some said I needed a polishing compound to get rid of the cloudiness. When wet the marbles look great, but as soon as they dry the cloudiness is back. Can someone tell me what polishing compound I should get and how to use it? I have quite a few marbles that would be gorgeous if they were clear.

Thanks for any help

Kathy

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Guest FeelingMarbleous

Try calling a local glass company for installing windows, they have a compound that you have to mix yourself but it's not hard, just add water and it comes in several grits, you will want something heavy enough to take out the scratches you left with the pads tho.

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Try calling a local glass company for installing windows, they have a compound that you have to mix yourself but it's not hard, just add water and it comes in several grits, you will want something heavy enough to take out the scratches you left with the pads tho.

Something that easy will remove the cloudiness from the surface? Great

Thank you for the help.

Kathy

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I use a fine, dry grit pad then switch to a buff pad and Maas metal polish, it works like a charm. I just smooth it out over the surface thinly, then get to buffing with my dremmel equiped with a buff pad bit. Best of Luck! It sure is rewarding when you get those beauties back to life! God Bless!

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I use a fine, dry grit pad then switch to a buff pad and Maas metal polish, it works like a charm. I just smooth it out over the surface thinly, then get to buffing with my dremmel equiped with a buff pad bit. Best of Luck! It sure is rewarding when you get those beauties back to life! God Bless!

I ordered some cerium oxide and cerium pads. It kills me when I see them wet and gorgeous then dry they are awful. I hope the cerium works. any suggestions for using it?

Kathy

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I have never used it but i just started polishing. I have even used crest tooth paste believe it or not! lol It actually is more abrasive than the Maas polish cream and works good for me. But I have found it takes lots and lots of time, which I seem to have alot of these days. Let me know how that cerium oxide works for you maybe I will pick some up too. :)

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I tried the hand route but I gave up, I did do a couple pretty well but it is a lot harder than you think. I'm talking several hours and my hands started to cramp and I don't have that kind of time and patience. Not trying to discourage you but my honest opinion and I hope you succeed where I just don't have the knack for it. I used Cerium oxide for the final polish and bought it online at ebay from a Vulcan's Workshop seller or something like that. You mix it with water, etc. I wish you much luck since I had no luck.

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Guest FeelingMarbleous
The secret to easier hand polishing is not skipping any grits. Peace,Galen

Thats pretty much not just a secret but the only way it can work, and if you wind up skipping some steps the results will be far less rewarding as if you would have followed the steps in the order of the grit, the main thing is try and stay within 200 or 300 difference of grits as you progress, and Scott i know your still reading the board as a guest and you act like it takes rocket science to remove some scratches from a marble and it doesn't common sense tells you to keep on raising the grit to keep on taking out what you left behind with the last grit, so in other words Kathy, do not skip over by much and you will get better results.......

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Yes, it isn't hard to do marbles that you are only doing minor work too or just want to polish. This is how I mixed my cerium oxide: it was recommended 8 to 1 ratio so I took 1 tablespoon of cerium oxide and I had Optical Grade which is cheaper and 8 tablespoons of distilled water, don't use tap water and put it in a spray bottle, shake it up well and when using, shake occasionally. But if you want to tackle larger handmades with extensive damage and have to take off over 1/8th of glass, it does take a lot of time and hurt the heck out of my fingers. I bought a lot of several damaged handmades thinking I could just do it manually fairly easy and it wasn't for me.

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Yes, it isn't hard to do marbles that you are only doing minor work too or just want to polish. This is how I mixed my cerium oxide: it was recommended 8 to 1 ratio so I took 1 tablespoon of cerium oxide and I had Optical Grade which is cheaper and 8 tablespoons of distilled water, don't use tap water and put it in a spray bottle, shake it up well and when using, shake occasionally. But if you want to tackle larger handmades with extensive damage and have to take off over 1/8th of glass, it does take a lot of time and hurt the heck out of my fingers. I bought a lot of several damaged handmades thinking I could just do it manually fairly easy and it wasn't for me.

Thanks for all the input. I did buy the diamond polishing pads in 5 different grits. I have some that I got to be quite smooth, but then they were cloudy. So I am hoping the cerium oxide with the cerium pads will bring back the shine. My hands cramp very easily so I won't be able to do this if it is too hard. I have been washing any new marbles in Efferdent denture cleaner. It works really well. I let them soak in a plastic bowl with warm water and efferdent and then rinse and the undamaged ones come out sparkling clean.

I'll let everyone know how the cerium works when I get it.

Thanks everyone

Kathy

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I use 220 grit to start, then I do 1000 grit. Final polish to get the glass shine I use SUper Cerum. Try Kingsly North for the grits. I use a three head machine. At this time I am running eight and I have sold four machines to local guys to polish mibs.

Snyd

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most glass colors contain LEAD, not very freindly to the human body. I wont mention arsenic or other toxic metals.

glass formulas are full of many hazardous materials, glass itself is basicaly harmless until you return it to powders, then it becomes very very dangerous, imagine what is going on while polishing, you arent removing solid chunks.

I dont think I need to mention the hazards of polishing compounds at this point, the glass itself is enough.

I work glass for a living, call it inside information if you will, I never polish or grind without a respirator and protective clothing, find the MSDS for the compounds, it may convince you to do the same.

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Thanks for the reminder!

I've dealt with safety issues at work for many years, and am convinced that you really can't overdo it as far as keeping it foremost in people's minds.

Would you clarify your use of 'respirator' when working with glass? Is there a paper mask adequate for this, or is a genuine respirator, what those unfamiliar would think of as a 'gas-mask sort of thing', necessary? Thanks, Bob

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Hey, Gary!

Hadn't thought to use the Dremel buffing pad. That'll be fun to try.

Have you ever seen the cylindrical but with a point at one end buffing attachment offered for sale by itself?

I see them in the '300 piece assortment' packs, but never as a stand-alone item. Thanks, Bob

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I use a typical respirator with HEPA filter or better, even though the grinding and polishing is in a wet environment there are still chances of airborn particles, also rubber gloves to protect the skin, they can be the old diswashing type for comfort and control, also wear a smock or bib to protect clothing, you dont want any contaminants in your home. I even wear rubber boots that stay in the cold work shop LOL.

Any dry buffing with a dremmel is not safe in MHO

If you want a marble polished, send it to a "professional" they are getting paid to take the risks.

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Hey, Gary!

Hadn't thought to use the Dremel buffing pad. That'll be fun to try.

Have you ever seen the cylindrical but with a point at one end buffing attachment offered for sale by itself?

I see them in the '300 piece assortment' packs, but never as a stand-alone item. Thanks, Bob

Check your local Walmart for single bits, or Tractor Supply, Ace Hardware might have them as well. My local Walmart has the stand alone bits for sale for cheap so you don't have to buy a huge kit. I like the dremmel and have even used some heavy epoxy on a nail head to glue the marble I am working on to the top, then use the nail in the dremmel on the sanding surfaces to get it nice and round. The trick with that is to get it exactly centered when you glue it on there and work on it in short durations letting it cool down enough so it doesn't heat and crack, or heat up and pop off the nail, which sends the mib flying! lol It's probably dangerous, which is why I send out that warning. Just make sure to have fun, take your time and enjoy it. It can be slow going at times and your hand will cramp up from time to time, but I just take a short break and that does it for me. Polishing mibs for me is a journey, not a quick jaunt, so enjoy the process and you will definately be rewarded in the end product! God Bless you all!

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some people just dont get it griff.......

here... take this dinamite and shorten the fuse a bit, put some lube on it and put it where the sun dont shine, then back up against a campfire, careful not to burn your cheeks, in a few seconds you wont know the diference between a polished marble or a rock.

Glass dust is hazardous, colors contain LEAD, silicosis is a form of cancer, arsenic can ruin your sex drive!

Anyway, I tryed to give some solid advice. my good deed for the day!

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Great safety advice is being given to help. I thought everyone knew about dangers such as working with glass. I am a commercial roofer and believe me, safety is a daily concern. The dust can even get inside your skin/pores. So when it is 85 degrees I have to wear long sleeves, a respirator, and gloves so that I am protected from Asbestos, handling lead soil pipes, Fiberglass, Pitch, and all the other things you can suffer averse effects from. It's been stated that the dust from the glass is dangerous, wetting it down helps keep it down but it is very dangerous in the long term effects for doing marble work. The dust of various things can become injested through the nose and mouth and once it enters your body it stays there and can permanently scar your lungs, etc not taking into the fact the carcinogen angle. They have respirators that go over your face with a filter to protect you/looks like a gas mask and I have pics if you want to see what ones you should use that I have, dust masks help but are not a good thing to use for continued work with grinding glass and shouldn't be used, particles still get through them. Gloves are needed, latex or nonpermeable are the best with long sleeves/pants mandatory. Everyone be safe and one of these days when I have the money I will build/buy a 3 head machine. That hand stuff is too hard for what I want to do it for. Wouldn't a dremmel get a MIB out of round fast and have a wavy/uneven surface I would imagine and I have never thought of using one, and wouldn't? Doing them by hand made me feel the same way because I couldn't seem to get them all perfectly round some times, I may try to just polish but not do major work/hand grinding anymore, because I just can't do it right but others mileage may vary. Seems like with all the hassle, using a machine would be worth it in the long run if you plan on doing regular, major work on mibs.

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Obviously you did give good solid advice that was needed here, and hopefully everyone does 'get it' now. Thanks again!

I only asked the respirator question because so many people who aren't familiar with them often misinterpret the word.

Here is a photo for the unacquainted. Please note that the two round things are replaceable cartridges. They screw on.

They are replaceable not only because they don't last forever, but because there are many types of them and it's very

important that you get the appropriate ones for the materials you're dealing with! Also very important that you get the

appropriate size for your face, and if you're an ape-man like me that you shave before using it. Most people's best bet

is going to be to physically go to an experienced seller of safety equipment, where they can make sure that you have

an appropriate fit, and also advise on exactly what you need for the work you're planning.

Also please note how serious these guys are! They really mean it, because they're concerned.

When Griff says he's not joking, he isn't.

And when Oldmarblenut, as a professional, stays away from any 'dry' grinding, sanding, or polishing even though he has access

to good safety equipment, that's something to remember, along with his advice that you're probably best-off going for the

safest approach of all and sending your marble to a professional.

Sorry to ramble on, but this really is important information. Bob ( :

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It's ok boys, im half dead already. No harm no foul :) Seriously though, thanks for the information. I will look into doing things the safest way possible. I suppose ignorance really is bliss because I had a ball! lol God Bless

p.s. The "dynamite" idea doesn't work. I couldn't get close enough to get the fuse lit. Maybe I cut the fuse too short?? Maybe next time... lol

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Thanks Guys!

I didn't mean any foul with the dinamite, just wanted to point out just how important simple things can be.

Honestly, the guys with the 3 head polishers can do fine jobs on anyones marbles for a very small fee, it's worth the cost to save yourself the risk, another thing to consider is to keep what you polish for your own collection, I've seen too many polished marbles running through the community, sooner or later they can hurt the hobby like so many other factors have.

Peace!

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Well put marblenut. Just for the record I have only polished a few mibs and I don't plan on selling any of them. Although I would polish mibs for friends if they asked. It's just way to fun to let someone else do it for me. And I have more time than money so economically, it works for me. However, I will be looking at getting some other gear to lessen the risks of contaminating the earth. God Bless

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