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Akro Snakes?


lavincen
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The one on the right strikes me as unusual. Is the base a translucent yellow? What does it look like backlit?

Okay, about your actual question :) ... some would call the one on the left a snake. I don't think the right would be called that.

"Snake" is a collectors name. Akro's name for the one on the left was Spiral. So that's what I'd generally call it.

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That one on the right could be called a snake. Ann is right that collectors had their own names. The one on the right has a surface cork that wraps around like a snake and little boys would call it that. It also can be called a "tight line" cork because it wraps around the marble so many times. Pretty one!

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I agree that since it's a collector's name it doesn't really matter, but I save the term "snake" for just those corkscrews that have transparent bases, like the one on the left. The base can be colorless or colored (a little harder to find), but transparent.

The one on the right I'd put with my translucent-based corks -- which are harder to find! For me, anyway. And they come in some pretty odd colors.

But then I've become obsessive about my transparent-based Akros . . . warning.

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There's a reason I try to stick with the names Akro gave the marbles.

But I don't know what name Akro gave the one like Lavincen showed above ... or the somewhat similar one Bill just posted with the blue and translucent green. (That's yummy, Bill!)

Interesting to hear that some classify them as snakes.

The cork ribbon really pops against those translucent bases.

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Since I'm new to this, I went with the vernacular. As a coin collector, the glossary is a lot less in volume. Now I am wondering about value. Would the one on the right be worth more? And what would be that worth? I now it's about what a buyer wants to pay, but is it like: A standard Akro corkscrew is worth $X, so the one on the right is worth $X + a small premium?

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There's a very wide range in cork prices.

Did you check out Bob Block's book yet? Does it have updated prices? In his older edition he would give prices for basic corks in different categories (such as prizename and popeye, if I recall correctly). And then he'd give multipliers for when they had special features. Like it might be worth 2 times as much or 1.5 times as much with a certain feature. I once used the multipliers in his older edition -- used about three at once which I thought applied to the same marble -- and ended up with an estimated value of about $2500. I eventually sold the marble for $80 to someone I trusted to tell me straight what the value was. I wasn't sure about my grading at the time, and so I asked about that and about what he really thought the marble was worth. It was a wet mint marble (which I had been afraid to say in my description) and he said he would have paid $100 for it if he had a chance to view it in hand at a show.

My point?

Ummm ... not sure .... oh yeah ... there's really not a simple formula -- there's not even a standard corkscrew. The most common corkscrews probably sell for less than a dollar. Others sell for hundreds.

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Maybe someone will yet be willing to take a swing at an estimate for that particular corkscrew. You have to keep condition in mind though. I think I see some tiny fractures. Are there any other condition issues?

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There's a reason I try to stick with the names Akro gave the marbles.

I'm trying too. I only really allow myself the liberty with the transparent-based spirals . . . even then I only have three: the basic snake; the ribbon snake (super thin & horizontal, kinda HTF), and the auger. I'm a born (and then trained) classifyer, so it's hard, hard . . .

Lately I've been trying to write "spiral" instead of "corkscrew," I'm trying.

Total failure in post # 8.

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To give condition issues, I would have to really look at it under a loop, which I don't have right now (another tool purchase for me :).

TO ME Neither has value as an akro buyer

The damage on the left has it going in my crap pile. The annealing on the right...it would have to be a REALLY rare marble for me to take one with annealing,but I would take annealing over holes.

0.00 on let

1.00 on right

Snakes are nice marbles. I have a large pile of them. I am not into the CRAZY color desire in my Akros, like others, so I tend to sell off my 2 color augers and snakes. It is funny how collectors vary. I had a baby blue snake with an oxblood rivulet tracing the cork. Marble had a chip...trash to me...but sure enough someone paid 25.00 on ebay for it. People vary in want and acceptance. I am sitting here with 50 or so marbles in bags I am going to list. Most have minor scratches and a few of the rarer ones have pocket wear or small pock marks. But I am to the point the marble has to be pretty much perfect to keep since the market is listing and marbles are out there to be had. The solid mint marble just has more appeal. It survived 80 years of kids and other random happenings to come to me and look the same it did the day it rolled and dropped down into the bucket ;)

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I'm not sure where that ring is drawn or what you see. I see a marble with a thin layer of clear glass near the bottom. I also see that ring drawn around the shadow of the marble on the bottom part of the marble pic. I do not see an annealing fracture and I do know what they look like.

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Not reflections

Do the math

The angles of the annealing VS the surface and then the "C" Scratch

Also, not sure where the " And I know what they look like" came from. I did not imply otherwise

I Re-DLed he image, zoomed in 185%

I could see where the right line COULD be viewed as a possible reflection, but zoomed in, there is nothing for the left line to "Mirror"

They are annealing cracks

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