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Do Dutches Need To Be White?


orbboy
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Best guess is impurities in the clay. Pure kaolin will give you white (porcelain), but a touch of iron or something else in it would give you an off-white to tan color once it was fired. I don't know that any were deliberately made that way, but then I don't know everything. Don't remember Paul Bauman mentioning it in his antique marbles book . . . which is basically what I go by.

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Could it have been glazed and all the glaze have worn away with a remnant of color bleeding through?

I had a clay boulder once which looked completely undecorated but under blacklight you could see that it once had a floral decoration.

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I once crossed my fingers and held my breath while ducking an old unglazed china in some soapy water and scuffing it lightly with a toothbrush. Figured it wasn't worth anything the way it was, and I could just make out that some kind of decoration had been on it. I was in for a surprise. It whitened up nicely (not as white as a glazed one would be) and revealed that the now-faded but obvious decoration was a pinwheel.

I don't think I've ever used a black light on my Chinas. What have I been thinking?? Work work work work . . .

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