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Vitro Aquamarines


Steph
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Thanks for the help with Superiors. Next on the checklist is Aquamarines. What is their range of variation?

I think of their "textbook" description as this which Smitty posted about them at Marble Mental. Smitty's wife is the one who named the Aquamarines.

Originally it was "aqua/maroon" but that seemed confusing and was short lived and changed to aquamarine.............There are going to be slight variations in color and I don't think there is anything carved into stone as to what qualifies. I just wanted to shed some light as to what "we" call Aquamarines.

They are generally opaque with a cream color base and somewhat of an aqua patch and also a maroonish/brown patch.

Here's Bob B's famous Aquamarine photo, as seen in Chuck B's Tri-Lites article, OLDER VITRO MARBLES (TRI-LITES). This photo has been presented as quintessential Aquamarines. Lately though I've seen some mibs being called Aquamarines which seem quite a bit different. So I was wondering how far other collectors feel comfortable taking the name.

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Okay , , , here's Chuck's description.

The colors of Aquamarines are aqua (or teal) blue, a creamy tan and a dark transparent red. (See Photo #3) Aquamarines range from swirls with appealing rip lines to patches.

I guess my question is how does that translate visually. Are the examples I've been seeing of late people pushing the boundaries because they want to think they have aquamarines when they don't? Or have I been too strict in my interpretation? Trying to sort that out. Thanks.

For an example, I've seen some called aquamarines where the base seemed rather close to being white. What's the range of base color which is 'allowed', or considered desireable. What's desireable in the patches? Stuff like that.

Thanks again. -s

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Thanks Bo. That's one of the kinds I'm wondering about. I wouldn't have thought so but they seem to be in the range some people are saying is okay for aquamarine. Hopefully someone with the inside dope will weigh in.

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The word I'm hearing is that a tan color is important. Tan like the sand of Lake Superior & Lake Michigan. :-) I live less than a mile away from Lake Michigan. I suddenly feel an urge to go get me a bucketful of sand.

No kidding - I think I'll take a walk this evening!

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Quintessential Aquamarines? Sure they may be, but once again just a fancy Tri-lite. I was told that tan is a must. However dark brown is sought after more by high end Vitro collectors. Look at this one I posted and aside from the little nibbles what ones would you rather have in your collection? I think the difference is like night and day between the commonish plain ones and these. I don't think I need to explain why this is not one of the $5.00 jobbies. Like all marbles there are "Higher End" examples and just plain "examples".

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I thought Smitty had put his stamp of approval on those in Bob's pic. I know Chuck did. And since I don't even have one . . . LOL . . . I'll take 'em!

So Dave, here's the lesson I'm taking from you: Don't Compromise. Tan is a must and if you vary, go dark. Do I have that right?

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Hell no! Compromise away. Who am I to tell someone what to collect. If you like em you like em! I'm just trying to show what is out there and what people want. Like I said there are "Examples" and there are "Examples!!!!" Peltier is a great example of a certain type of marble selling for $20.00 or $200.00. Take a common 4 ribbon lets say Peltier Tiger with typical construction and a little Aventurine. Nice marble sure, but would it bring as much money as the same size marble with a great swirl and a bit more Aventurine? I think not. Pretty much all marbles follow the "better than others" rule.

What I was really trying to say in this thread was more for the newer collectors here. Mainly that if you like Aquamarines spending $30.00 on one of the common ones would be a bit silly considering you might be able to score a nicer one for the same price. Don't be fooled by just a name.

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Here's a No. 4 outlier. It has a considerable amount of butter-colored transparent glass, but it also has aqua, brown and red. Is it a poor example of an Aquamarine or a poor example of an Aquamilk? I think it got lost somewhere between the two types and wound up being neither. But I still think it's a purty marble.

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