Jump to content

What Camera Do You Use To Take Quality Pictures Of Your Marbles?


marbledave
 Share

Recommended Posts

It's hard to tell what would serve you well with so little information.

But Edna's mention of a tripod is the most important advice you need

to know. Get one that has consistent good reviews, and pay a little

more than you might like if necessary. Until you get a decent tripod

it won't matter much which camera you get. ( :

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice tripod, Catfish!

A necessity for the 'make us drool' Canon telephoto.

And also for close-up marble photos.

I think a lot of people don't realize how touchy and precise things get

when you're coming in close. Being rock-steady is crucial. ( :

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've found over the years that lighting is more important than anything else. If you don't have a good lighting setup, then it doesn't matter how much you spend on your camera and tripod, you're not going to get good images.

After that then I'd agree on the tripod. You're taking closeups of small objects, so movement is a lot less forgiving than if you were taking portraits.

Finally, go to Best Buy (or PC Richards or whatever) and look at the cameras you are interested in, set them to macro and see how close up and clear you can focus on the letters on the price cards they have next to the cameras. If you can't focus up close on the letters, you're not going to be able to focus on a marble.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A good tripod and a camera that can take sharp close-up pictures won't do you much good if the camera doesn't also have either a self-timer or a remote.

I have no complaints about the photo-quality of my Canon Powershot SX-10 IS.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Likewise...just a click n go :-)

My Nikon is over ten years old also, it has a timer but I don't know how to use it ...lol

It's only five megapixels which is more than enough for the internet.

Those Vivitar flashes I bought in the late 80's ....dinosaurs by todays stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If anyone wants to try with their own dinosaur Sony Mavica (FD71?), I have one laying around. :-) This is the camera that you have to slide 5-1/4" floppy discs into it, because there is no onboard memory (can you even get those discs anymore?). Long before memory sticks, SD cards, etc. It probably has some historical value because I shot some early auctions with it (probably around auction 12-20 or something like that). I even still have the charger. I tried giving it to one of my kids, but they have ipod touches with cameras, so they've turned their noses up at it :-)

Check this out on Ebay, you can buy a lot of 5 for $20!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lot-of-5-Sony-Mavica-MVC-FD71-0-4MP-Digital-Camera-W-Strap-Batteries-Parts-/140827524613?pt=Digital_Cameras&hash=item20c9f97e05

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't use flash when taking pictures of marbles, and when I do use flash for indoor photos, it doesn't usually wash things out.

Read posts #15 thru #18 in the following thread.

http://marbleconnect...__fromsearch__1

Posted 27 March 2012 - 05:27 PM

thanks Steve, the base in blue is not white. flash washes it out. it has the same color base as all the blue angels I am seeing here actually. :-) in fact it looks like a twin to the one marblemiser posted. hey and thanks for the compliment miser!

zaboo's auctions, and also ebay's zaboo2smarbles

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the advice!!! I 'd like to buy a multi thousand dollar camera but just don't have the funds being a single dad with 2 kids still needing to go through college...I'm sure this is the case for many of you, i would like to take some close up pictures with a camera that will do the job and not cost more than $500.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought my camera two years ago, used, for less than $275. It can be used fully automatic, if you want to do that, and it can give good results that way. Of course, you could get even better results using some manual settings.

Follow Bob Block's practical advice when choosing a camera.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...