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William Mckinley Sulphide


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made in Bulgaria or the real deal? :icon_popcorn:

RARE 1890's SULPHIDE GLASS MOTTO MARBLE WILLIAM McKINLEY PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN RARE 1890's SULPHIDE GLASS MOTTO MARBLE WILLIAM McKINLEY PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN

McKINLEY & PROTECTION~SOUND MONEY & PROSPERITY MUST C !

http://www.ebay.com/itm/RARE-1890s-SULPHIDE-GLASS-MOTTO-MARBLE-WILLIAM-McKINLEY-PRESIDENTIAL-CAMPAIGN-/271533339478?pt=Marbles&hash=item3f38a5f356

$_57.JPG?rt=nc

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And because it ended on the 4th. She didn't trust it to go too high.

I would never bid on a seller who tries to put a "legal addendum" saying that it was "as is" and the buyer couldn't open a case with ebay and paypal. If that was true every seller would claim ignorance and put that in their auction too. She also has a LOT of reasons for no returns. Even if its her fault not to mention something ing the auction or pics.

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She had posted a link to the auction a few days ago on my Facebook page (which I don't allow). So, instead of just deleting the post, I mentioned that there had been discussion on the marble boards as to whether the marble was old or new. Then she got pissy.

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The inclusion has an Akron feel to it - what I like to refer to as Akron Blue - this same shade is found on toy marbles and ceramics produced in town.

In July of 1896 - J.H. Leighton was running the J.H. Leighton & Company in Akron - glass toy marbles was the main product. The works of the American Marble and Toy Manufacturing Company were just up the canal a few hundred yards.

Would love to see this marble in hand.....too bad there is not a great pontil photo.

The marble exhibits 'expediency' to my eyes - the inclusion with its faint ghost stamping on the edges furthers this view and makes it seem more 'mass produced' than a one-off contemporary work.

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  • 3 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Lot # : 233 Estimate : 3,000.00 - 5,000.00 USD Description :

President McKinley Campaign Sulfide Marble.
We believe this to be an American made melted pontil circa 1896 probably produced by J.H. Leighton and Co. glass factory. He was producing melted pontil marbles at this time. The ceramic inclusion was probably made by the American Marble and Toy company in Akron, Ohio. Samuel Dyke was in the political novelty manufacturing business since the election of 1884. Dyke had many associations with McKinley including being appointed to represent the United States as ambassador at large for trade in 1898. The sulfide is a thin disk which the lettering is the typical color of blue unique to Akron made ceramic. One side of disk is stamped McKinley and protection and the other side is stamped sound money and prosperity. I would like to thank Paul Baumann and Brian Graham, curator for the American Toy Marble Museum for they're valuable input. This rare American sulfide has great surface condition. Surface shows as made cold roll marks which I like to see. Condition (9.5). Size 1 - 1/8".
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  • 1 year later...

I am very skeptical of this being a campaign item (as in an item distributed by his campaign directly). "Sound Money" was a campaign slogan of McKinley, but there was a lot of debate at the time regarding the National banking system, and a lot of his slogans use that as their theme. It seems odd that there is additional wording in this slogan. In reading the morphys description it is possible that this was made by a McKinley supporter, but toys were not widely used as campaign items until the 20th century, when the amount of eligible voters became much larger and more diverse.

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I have some real nice images of this marble on my shop computer - will try to remember to share some Saturday when I am there. The marble was hard to photograph - the focal point/ plane was difficult to capture due to lack of surface features. I was fortunate to have examined the marble in hand for well over an hour. I have no doubt that it is an age appropriate piece.

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I believe it is age appropriate, I just think this would not have come directly from McKinleys campaign. Most campaign items would have been made in large enough quantity to distribute at an event or rally, so there would probably be more than one of these. This, in my mind, is likely something that was made for a specific person (or small group) by Leighton and/or Dyke, perhaps for a fundraising effort or something like that. It is certainly unique in terms of presidential campaign memorabilia.

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I couldn't say for sure either who initiated the making of the item - same statement would hold true for the ceramic political jugs Sam Dyke started making in 1884. 1000's of these were produced for both Republican and Democratic candidates in 1884, 1888, and 1892.

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I couldn't say for sure either who initiated the making of the item - same statement would hold true for the ceramic political jugs Sam Dyke started making in 1884. 1000's of these were produced for both Republican and Democratic candidates in 1884, 1888, and 1892.

That is true, but just the fact that there were thousands of them means they were probably for different purposes. The marble looks to me like it would have been difficult to make.

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