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Why did they make peewee hand cut agates?


bumblebee
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I finally got my first green dyed true peewee agate, and again I wonder why they would have taken the trouble to make these?

We know hand cut agates required a lot of skill and labor, were highly prized as shooters, and were not affordable to most kids.

So why make peewees?

Were they cheaper?

Was it the same reason we like them today, because they're cute and dainty and amazing?

 

peeweeagates.jpg

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Bob's answer makes the most sense at a glance.

I'm still puzzled why I have so many 9/16" and under without purposely seeking them out (aside from my green one), but I assume back in the day the children adopted the peewees as marbles in the same way we adopted steelies.

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On 1/27/2018 at 4:23 PM, lstmmrbls said:

There were also many solitaire boards made that used 1/2" or smaller marbles.  My guess would be most were for game pieces.

I'm not too sure about that. I don't think you see many antique wood solitaire boards that are for peewees. You do see tin and cardboard and part of game sets, but they almost always have clays in them.

 

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Peewee solitaire boards were part of game boxes. I have seen few with mica swirls but never seen with agates. Letter openers and bookmarks used all kinds of sizes and finding with peewee agates are harder to find than larger agates. 

Agate blocks were found in all kind of shapes and the makers probably wanted to use every bit of piece to make the marble specially if the agate is dyed.

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