Jump to content

False Advertising Much?


Chordus
 Share

Recommended Posts

Those marbles are certifiably by a Chinese manufacturer. I have a box with a set of them. I think the box was $8 for 20 marbles, to put the price into perspective. (And to be frank, $8 was a bit much).

Also to put it in perspective: I have a very large solitaire board with beautiful stone marbles that cost the same price. I'd say that no sane person would ever buy that set for that price, but the fallacy there is that there are a lot of people in the world who are not sane.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have seen 3 of those sets in folks homes and they were all very proud of them because they thought the marbles were beautiful. I am sure they all paid a lot more money for them than I would have but they were very proud of them and happy to have them. None of these folks knew anything about marbles and did not collect them. They simply showed them to me because I mentioned I collected marbles. And every one of them was very sane. I did not tell them they paid much more than they should have. There was no need. And hand blown is a common misnomer when it comes to handmade glass. I have seen a thousand times worse things in ebay listings. Peace, Galen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This Thread and Chinese marble listing is an excellent object lesson. At least 10 years ago Marlow Peterson was selling groups of 40 these self-same Chinese marbles (Maybe not as spiffy as these!) for something like half the price. So here ignoring the Board we're only talking $2 each. No biggie! I don't know about most of you but in my marble experiences I am called upon quite often to provide some estimation for marbles that are fraught with background experiences that are enough to make you quaver(sentimentality, Dad's favorites, Grandpa's shooters, someones buy of a lifetime and on and on). Galen has it nailed here! Aside from the over'blown' nature of the verbiage in this listing I believe we have to accept the fact that the general public will never-ever catch up to us in marble knowledge and on those occasions where we are called upon to make marble pronouncements a bit of humbleness might carry the day, even if, God forbid, the marble in question is for want of a better word.....ugly! Of course, in the interest of full disclosure, someone should take the necessary steps to advise this seller and eBay that the information provided is not fully accurate. David

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's not an ebay link.

How is the information provided inaccurate?

Under the details tab it tells where the item was manufactured. The "European origin" reference appears to be about the history of the game. Do you have proof that the historical information is inaccurate? The game could be of Chinese origin historically, but I don't know that. The seller artfully walks a fine but relatively/technically accurate line. imho.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After seeing this item, I did some re-shuffling as I had a very old presidents board setting on top of one of my marble cabinets with those Chinese marbles on it. They now are elsewhere and some German Hand-made marbles took their place. Years ago the first ones of those Chinese marbles that I had seen were offered by Marble Allan. I bought a few hundred of them and so did the Lee's Marble Museum here in York, Neb. Later----Leroy----

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not eBay.....right. Probably eBay tomorrow though. Six of one/half doz. of another. And no matter how you parse it the terminology used encourages a buyers imagination by omission. I kind of side with Morrison & Terrison re. origin of the General Grant Board. The cover of their book (either the yellow or red cover) has a General Grant Board w/German Swirls and on the back cover they give credence to the Union soldiers during the Civil War carrying and playing the game. That early example of the board also having an under compartment that swung out to reveal the marbles. For full disclosure I'd refer you to Paul Baumann's 4th Edition in which he also puts forward the Civil War period as somewhat definitive but provides a European component with two other solitaire boards: "Fox and Geese" and "German Tactics." both games employing different strategies. Or strategeries! David

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To answer your question, Steph, the information is inaccurate in several ways:

1) These marbles are not blown. Blowing glass is a very different art than manufacturing marbles. As sissydear (Edna? I'm horrible with names) said, there are marbles which are made from blown glass, but I can assure you that the ones on this site are not.

2) The marbles are not handmade (or "handblown," as it were). These come from a marble manufacturer in China. And while the site may state this in the small print (which it does NOT in the magazine I originally found it in, I may add), the fact of the matter is that the description itself is false.

3) You are correct, these could be "made in the Venetian" tradition; being from one country doesn't mean they aren't influenced by another. I highly doubt that the marbles are really influenced by various techniques from Venice. But let's say for a moment that they are: it's still misleading to compare manufactured marbles from China with Venetian glass. Given what Jeeperman here says, that he's met people thinks that these are Italian made, I think that's pretty clear evidence that the advertisement is giving false impressions.

As for your comment, David:

"I believe we have to accept the fact that the general public will never-ever catch up to us in marble knowledge"

I agree that it's ridiculous to expect other people to know what we do about marbles. There are thousands of collectible items out there, and it'd be impossible for any individual to know about all of them. However, it is a seller's duty to know what they are selling, and not to rip off a customer so flagrantly. I realize that this is perhaps unrealistic, but I still feel strongly that it should be the case.

Also, for the record, I kinda like these marbles; that's why I have a few myself. In terms of Chinese marbles, they're certainly better than others. I just think that the price they're going for here is outrageous.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To answer your question, Steph, the information is inaccurate in several ways:

1) These marbles are not blown. Blowing glass is a very different art than manufacturing marbles. As sissydear (Edna? I'm horrible with names) said, there are marbles which are made from blown glass, but I can assure you that the ones on this site are not.

2) The marbles are not handmade (or "handblown," as it were). These come from a marble manufacturer in China. And while the site may state this in the small print (which it does NOT in the magazine I originally found it in, I may add), the fact of the matter is that the description itself is false.

Yes, they come from China. However, they are handmade. As Galen noted, the "handblown" terminology is a common misnomer for handmade marbles. I've seen it used for years (in old newspapers and such).

If I were trying to sell them, I'd describe them differently, but I'm not trying to sell them. So .... well, I'm out of anything else to say. But they are indeed handmade to the best of my knowledge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem is the bit where the sellers who know better, I'd say. Not that this has ever stopped people from doing it anyway. :P

Are these marbles really handmade? If so, what definition of "handmade" are we using here? Given the vast quantity of these marbles in circulation, and their price, it's very difficult for me to conceive of how marbles are handmade at that sort of speed and price. I'll concede that these are handmade if you all are certain about it, but I can't see how.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unfortunately they are handmade as opposed to machine-made and 'economies of labor' to put a fancy name to cheap Chinese labor are why they can be imported and offed still relatively cheap all considered. We're only talking $2 each here! Otherwise you have a lock on what I've referred to as commission by omission. David

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An Addendum: Was picking up Patti Smith's "Just Kids" at Barnes & Noble today and spotted one of those boards w/stones while in line. Couldn't help writing down some of the shuck and jive associated with it. Let me first say that the 32 stones were unexciting; kinda like processed stones....you know, processed meats! So, 33 semi precious stones touted as STONES OF THE WORLD $49.95 a solitaire set w/cards(!) "A timeless game of strategy from the court of King Louis XIV" For ages 8+. Personally I'd opt for the Chinese marble set at only $10 more. Some of those Chinese marbles show talent. I suppose after making a thousand of the same thing (or 10,000) you begin to deviate from the proscribed approach. By the way Patti Smith's book won a National Book Award and it reads as if it should have. The woman is a force of nature! David

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...