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Working On Some Pics With Photoshop


sissydear
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These are marbles I've photographed before. They are the Tribute Last Dance marbles from 2009. I am working with a new camera and a new photo editing program. I'm trying it out on you.

bull.jpg

Bull

this is the run that was done in honor of US Army Special Forces and this marble was named for "Bull" Simmons.

lone-wolf.jpg

Lone Wolf

This marble was named for Philip Garfield Arthur

the-colonel.jpg

The Colonel

This marble was named for Col. John Woolschlagger.

hardcore.jpg

Hardcore

This marble was named for David McCullough

I think I have solved the problem of the resizing. The size of these looks better, but now I have a problem of image distortion. The marbles on each side of the pic seem stretched out of round. Anybody know how to correct this?

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The rest of the marbles were named for dances in keeping with the "Last Dance" name of the run. It had nothing to do with being the last JABO run or even the last JABO run for the year. I named the run. My brother was a career Army man. I asked him what would be an appropriate name for a run that would honor the men of US Army Special Forces. He told me about a party for a deceased member of US Army Special Forces thrown by his family. The family celebrated his life at a party called "Last Dance". Since two of our honorees, John Woolschlagger and Bull Simmons were deceased, it seemed appropriate to me.

Here are a few of the marbles with dance names.

charleston.jpg

Charleston

golden-salsa.jpg

Golden Charleston

I think the new camera is showing the lutz better than the old Kodak. I am now using a Canon. Can you see the lutz in the Golden Charleston? Do I have the pics resized too small now?

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I saw the distortion but thought some of the marbles were just out of round!

Your seeming pride in your footballs made me want to go fish out some of the out-of-round ones I had shoved to back shelves!

I guess the football being in the back right corner on each photo might have been a clue that something was amiss. :P

Sorry - no idea about how to fix distortion.

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golden-flamenco.jpg

Golden Flamenco

Here's a marble you may never have seen. I never saw it for sale on ebay. It is very scarce. My share of this one was 7 marbles. I never gave any of this one away and the other investors may have kept all of theirs too. There were even fewer of this marble without the lutz.

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My son says it's the camera lens causing the distortion. He thinks the camera wasn't made to get as close to the marbles as I did, even though it's in focus. I'm going to ask the camera store and if that's what is wrong, I'll use it for other pics and do my marbles with the Nikon.

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Hi, Edna,

I'll throw a couple broad FWIW ideas at you.

The image resizing program suggested earlier sounds really good, but I haven't tried it and can't comment.

Overall, image resizing is a more interesting and complicated topic than most people might think. Many variables.

One particularly significant thing in most programs is to look for a checkbox that says something along the lines of "maintain proportions" and make sure it's checked.

Although I think your son is probably right about the distortion happening in-camera.

If this is true, don't even think about trying to 'correct' it later. It's not the type of distortion that even sophisticated photo programs were meant to correct.

The only solution is to prevent it in the first place. If your camera has a zoom lens a good rule of thumb is to make sure that you're 'zoomed' to at least a normal

perspective setting. This would be 50mm or so in traditional 35mm film camera measurements. Personally, I'd prefer to go to 80 or 90. (Mild tele-photo)

Lenses in the 85-105mm vicinity were traditionally called 'portrait' lenses since you could shoot a head-shot of someone without their nose looking too big or any

other exaggerated features. They give a slightly flattened perspective which is more pleasing to the eye and is less likely to distort shapes. This applies to both

'back to front' 3D style distortion and the 'stretched at the edges' type. So try zooming in and stepping back a little.

But really overall the photos look great, and thanks for posting such terrific marbles with the important real deal background information. :)

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...I think I have solved the problem of the resizing. The size of these looks better, but now I have a problem of image distortion. ...The marbles on each side of the pic seem stretched out of round. Anybody know how to correct this?

If reducing size you should be resampling with "Bicubic Sharper", "Bicubic Smoother" if enlarging, though I'm not sure why the distortion is occurring.

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I did these pics with my Nikon D60. I'm checking for distortion of the image.

edithirene.jpg

No distortion so I am convinced it's the camera. When I have time, i'll take it back to the store and show them what's happening.

This marble is named "Edith Irene" . It's named for the mom of Ron Shepherd.

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2310unnamedgreenaventurine2Cox.jpg

Unnamed marble. I love the ones in champagne glass with green aventurine and oxblood.

233unnamedlutzandpink.jpg

These are unnamed, almost peewees, and they have lutz.

237unnamed.jpg

Also unnamed from Friendship run in 2009. It's one of my favorites and very rare, I got enough to fill my keeper box with 7. I didn't give away any of this one.

ednarosslutz.jpg

This marble was named by Ed Parsons. It's called Edna Ross.

pletcher2Cweldon2Cedna2Ced.jpg

Good days and fun times! That's Steve Pletcher standing and seated are Weldon, Edna, and Ed Parsons.

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