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Oh Boy !! A New Catalog Name To Start Looking For!


Steph
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Cool item but I can't help but thinking it's possible and very probable that items could be imported from another country and repackaged/resold by the importing company. Japan, Germany, USA, Canada, England etc.

Don't let that slow the search, it's still an interesting piece of history but I don't think Sulphides (if that's what I see bottom right of the posted page) were made in Canada ----but there is an Ontario California. hmmm lol

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I'm sure you're right about the sulphides being imported.

I'm not sure why there would need to be repackaging. Wellll ... actually I did one time read something which made me think that Hong Kong did some repackaging of items they got from Japan to try to skirt "Certificate of Origin" and "Imperial Preference" rules.

But I'm still naive enough to believe that most of the time people were honest about country of origin! ( :

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I played with marbles in the early 1950's while living in Toronto, Canada. The word "marbles" was never

used by the kids...all marbles were called "allies", and this Nerlich ad may explain why.

I had thought the "Allies" name had come from Alley packaging, but perhaps not.

Most marbles in circulation were slags with a blue base, solid white with yellow etc. swirls and the usual

clearies. The only type I specifically remember were Vitro Phantom Conquerors.

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I wonder if those "Spangled Allies" are like the more modern Vacor ones. When I see those spotted ones here I generally pass them over. Should I be looking closer? It also might explain why I see them mixed in older lots from time to time?

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Is there are a better scan? I'm thinking opal agates might be clambroths, and Klondykes are goldstone (Lutz) which would make sense since the Klondike gold rush would have been ~ 10 years prior. At first I thought maybe Allies = glass and Agates = stone but it's not consistent from what I can make out in the article.

Other points of curiosity from what I can make out is the price of Red Agates vs Opal Agates, the size 15+ of Stone Agates, the 5% cash discount, left hand twist on some of the single marbles, and the premium price for Real Agates.

Given the pre-WW1 date I'd wager these were all imported from Germany. My attempt at a California Sulphide joke was terrible

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Snowflakes are micas. And this ad does say "snowflake spangles". So I bet you're right about these. I'm not sure about always.

In Robert's 1883 article, he seems to call glimmers and spangles different types, glimmers apparently being another word for micas. So I'm still not sure. Maybe the spangle name evolved.

So many marble names.

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I played with marbles in the early 1950's while living in Toronto, Canada. The word "marbles" was never

used by the kids...all marbles were called "allies", and this Nerlich ad may explain why.

I had thought the "Allies" name had come from Alley packaging, but perhaps not.

Most marbles in circulation were slags with a blue base, solid white with yellow etc. swirls and the usual

clearies. The only type I specifically remember were Vitro Phantom Conquerors.

Allies was a name for marbles from way back. Maybe 1700's? Possibly from "alabaster". I'll have to refresh my memory on that too.

Funny thing about Lawrence Alley - I've heard he never put his name on marble packaging.

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