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ID Help - Akro Blue Oxblood?


BENgineer
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18 minutes ago, chicagocyclist said:

It looks like Akro Oxblood to me.

 

8 minutes ago, Da Roberto said:

Yes, that's Akro's oxblood

I'm assuming you are both referring to the color of the oxblood that looks like Akro's. Do you have any advice or examples to help me spot the difference between the different company's oxblood color if so?

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57 minutes ago, BENgineer said:

 

I'm assuming you are both referring to the color of the oxblood that looks like Akro's. Do you have any advice or examples to help me spot the difference between the different company's oxblood color if so?

Yes, both.   It looked like Akro.  Then the ox is swirled, applied to the marble, the general characteristics that made me say Akro.  A Peltier might be applied more in a ribbon, from only a few I have seen.  I have read that Peltier Oxblood was more an accident of the chemical process involved rather than direct application but maybe somebody can read in here on oxblood for other companies.

Here's a group of my Akro oxbloods that I use for study and comparison.

20220811_181900.jpg

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There are variety of opinions on what is oxblood color for marbles. Different companies had different shades of oxblood. Sometimes even within the same company. Some oxblood was a special formula. Some oxblood can happen when certain glass components are put together. Some oxblood color can be from cullet, that is close to oxblood color. Most Heaton marbles labeled with oxblood, is actually a maroon color Vitrolite cullet. Some from actual oxblood cullet. Some antique handmade marbles have oxblood. The earliest machine made marbles with oxblood were probably the MFC brick marbles. If it is oxblood or not is a decision that each collector has to decide for their own self.  Most of the oxblood for Jabo marbles was from pieces of man made gold lutz. Many times it would burn up and disappear.  A gold lutz and green aventurine mixture makes nice oxblood. What each collector calls oxblood is experience. It is difficult to separate oxblood by companies. 

Vitrolite tile oxblood

DSC03866.JPG.3fab750ea6f3d56078a99e0be6e24917.JPGDSC03868.JPG.a9cec416601992c161fa6322e8612bbd.JPGDSC03870.JPG.1fae79779104ec8bfa4fe1b8517b42ef.JPG

modern oxblood applied to a Popeye marble

DSC05979.JPG.8e67a8a992118e1b84182798b9ec5890.JPG

Jabo oxbloods

DSC02308.JPG.58565de34e1646921a818f7d8e68c61a.JPGDSC03709.JPG.4822fb8694e920de46cf7c78bf10d589.JPGDSC03657.JPG.4875a8479a16130fd43d5ef50aba797f.JPG

Alley oxblood

DSC02855.JPG.0e79a1cf1e9383210e0443de2f3e98b3.JPG

DSC03250.JPG.540b86608db5244ad3f3aafac70278ef.JPGDSC06382.JPG.9fa36fe98cbc6790d588f3b6ad59b127.JPG

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I hoped that my amateur, partially complete answer might trigger something great and in depth description.  Maybe one day which I can give myself but I'm still don't have it committed to memory. Thank you all for filling in the chasm so wonderfully! And with photos and other versions and companies. I did search the Internet before I made my reply to try to supply some but found few  And could not validate their accuracy. Certainly a great refresher for me!!!!  I'm gonna add this to the archive as a seperate link.

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9 hours ago, Da Roberto said:

Heaton oxblood ..... with av

DSC05907.jpg

DSC05913.jpg

Whaaat? Transparent blue and wispy Oxblood swirling out and inside That's tuff to say the least, AnnnD Aventurine too! Not reflecting in photo, but I see that aventurine in there otherwise would never imagine other than fantasy or new. I mean, good photo as I do not see any reason to thinks it's contemporary, fake or otherwise new. To top it off a Heaton? I never saw that coming as well: 'Heaton?' Wow! So, this was dug-up at old site? 

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The original post is an akro with blue and oxblood but----I believe that it is an oxblood patch that went awry.
Just kicking the can!
All opinions are always welcomed.
Marble—On!!

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1 hour ago, Jeff54 said:

Che cosa? Blu trasparente e sottile sangue di bue che vortica fuori e dentro Quello è tufo per non dire altro, AnnnD Avventurina anche! Non riflettendo in foto, ma vedo che l'avventurina lì dentro altrimenti non la immaginerei mai se non fantasia o nuova. Voglio dire, buona foto perché non vedo alcun motivo per pensare che sia contemporanea, falsa o comunque nuova. Per finire un Heaton? Non l'ho mai visto arrivare: 'Heaton?' Oh! Quindi, questo è stato dissotterrato nel vecchio sito? 

Yes

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Can't leave out, accordingly, the Formula for oxblood in toy marbles MFC acquired, came from Germany.

    I managed to recover this old photo of a Blue Oxblood. Oxblood, the color, is thousands of years old.  From ceramics, glass, paint, clothing, you name it. In toy marbles, Germany's, being the first, I guess, IMO totally made the best. Perhaps for such nice colorants, temperatures, raw materials, whatever system to make their glass.  Defined in Germany's History; 'All of their Hand Gathered Glass marbles are "Imitation Agate".'  Credited too: Greiner, Vetter's Sohn. Just too bad this example has been played with, and old photo because, the Oxblood revels its potence with more clarity. 

Regardless, linage begins here:

 

324998826_Vetters-Sohn-Blue-Ox.jpg.d311429b4725eb4f2671f0e46c5cca4a.jpg

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Many full buckets came from that one hole. It was at the edge of the loading dock. We learned from a former employee why the marbles were there. But that is another story.  The other hot spot or great producer was by a city water line. Which was originally a ditch that maybe drained water from a spring. It was filled over level, full of marbles and dirt. Holes here filled with water about as fast as they were dug. But you can pull marbles up out of muddy water. I saw one woman fill a bucket and she never saw many of the marbles until they came out of the muddy water. Her son would dig up and loosen the dirt and then she would feel for the marbles. 

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