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Marble Id Help Please


Marlene
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Sorry but I see no Oxblood

qwE4GFSDvZX.jpg

Oxblood is red glass. Temperature effect usually....not always though ;)
Pelt has oxblood but it is a bit different than akro. It's supposed to be red and gets an actual dried blood color.
MK, same thing, they make red then, at times, you get an oddball color to the red that is called oxblood.
The problem is (No slight to my friend Galen of course) is tunnel vision.
Look at a brick and look at an Akro milky or silver ox. the color is SIMILAR but not the same, but both are Oxblood.
A brick, to me, is the TRUE oxblood color as I understand what a color pallet is and while i prefer Akro over it, those are "similar" but the effect is more like blood on water and I like that look better.
Oxblood is a shade of red, nothing more.
This is oxblood
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Posted Yesterday, 06:54 PM
Did marble king ever really have oxblood? I was pretty sure they just had red or sometimes red that was blended that gave the illusion of another color... Not sure if I would call any of it, that I've seen, oxblood. IMO
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Gnome, you're forgetting it's not that simple.

From a thread you started:

http://marbleconnection.com/topic/18628-slag-surprise/

akronmarbles

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 08:21 AM

Nice American Cornelian marble.

Red slags (Akro red slags, Cerise agates, etc) were colored with selenium - true 'oxblood' glass as known from MFC and Akro is made from copper - there is no continuum between the two. Copper ruby requires very specific heat treatment to develop the color on a predictable basis.

Good information here as well:

http://marbleconnection.com/topic/5371-oxblood/

Unfortunately the links and pics don't come up. Steph?

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Thanks Hansel for bringing that up, And Gnome, when it comes to OXBLOOD GLASS and glass with an oxblood color we are talking two different things. This helps keep an already fairly muddied topic from getting even more muddied. Oxblood colored glass is not necessarily Oxblood Glass. Although there are some very early Marble kings that have a very Oxblood looking streamers in one of the patches it does not even appear as genuine OXBLOOD GLASS . Spidermen being the most common. And yes many marbles made by German makers MFC and Akro purposefully made an OXBLOOD GLASS. I also believe that on occasion a true Oxblood Glass can be accidentally formed usually in association with a blue-turquoise glass color. I do not believe that is OXBLOOD GLASS on that MK. And it does seem you are saying any Oxblood colored glass on marbles should be called Oxblood. That just not the case. We need to have a line some where. Calling it Oxblood colored glass works for some folks but I do not even like seeing that.

No blinders on here Gnome. Just an almost 30 year collector trying to keep his hobby getting even more confusing an muddied for new and even old collectors than it already is.

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To me it looks like copper-based red glass -- the kind which may show with greater frequency in aqua glass.

I think copper or cupric oxide or whatever the right term is, was used in making the green glass and it manifested itself as what we call oxblood on Akros.

Sorry, Hansel, I think those links and pix are gone for real.

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Yay! another oxblood discussion

I also believe that on occasion a true Oxblood Glass can be accidentally formed usually in association with a blue-turquoise glass color.

To me it looks like copper-based red glass -- the kind which may show with greater frequency in aqua glass.

INteresting

Sorry, Winnie - a lot of people wouldn't call that oxblood (from the pics anyway) still pretty marbles though

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I think that others accidentally made what Akro made on purpose. Copper-based ingredients were used for oxblood and they were used for glass of other colors.

Oxblood's been around for a long time.

Ancient glass beads and ceramic glazes have oxblood, otherwise known as sang de beouf.

http://books.google.com/books?id=a8W2AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA775&lpg=PA775&dq=sang+de+boeuf+glass&source=bl&ots=pFeGn5MSA9&sig=7fiaV6kWoSImRPOpbkmvN80jh-o&hl=en&sa=X&ei=udJiU_bRJ62yygHP8YCQAg&ved=0CGMQ6AEwCg#v=onepage&q=sang%20de%20boeuf%20glass&f=false

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