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How Many Coors Do You See?


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My eye tells my brain there's more than three there, but exactly how many, I can't decide because of all of the blending.

As for the blending, if two different colors are fully blended together, doesn't that up the color count by one? I mean, blend yellow with blue or blue with red and you get a different color, right? :)

Holly

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actually Rich there is marble glass that does blend together to make another color. We often call it bleeds or blends. Red and yellow Akro glass will often form a green between the 2 colors. Some glass will make totally unexpected colors where they meet and bleed blend together. Probably a type of Chemical reaction? And as you stated there is also much glass that refuses to mix at all. It should say blue and yellow in the 3rd sentence.

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My eye tells my brain there's more than three there, but exactly how many, I can't decide because of all of the blending.

As for the blending, if two different colors are fully blended together, doesn't that up the color count by one? I mean, blend yellow with blue or blue with red and you get a different color, right? :)

Holly

The general rule is blends don't count as separate colors. :)

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Steph is right about blends. They don't count as a color. They really don't mix and the blend is created by chemicals in one glass that are not compatible with the other glass. Many of the greens contain copper and react with reds and yellows to discolor the red or yellow. It may look black or brown at the edges where the two glasses meet. Sometimes it discolors all of the red or yellow glass.

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. . . red and yellow Akro glass will often form a green between the 2 colors . . .

I don't know about that. Red & yellow will produce orange. You'd need yellow and blue to produce green. Unless you're talking about a particular chemical rection in glass that I'm not aware of.

Anyway, usually it's more a matter of one color overlaying another, to a greater or lesser degree, rather than a real mix or "blend," as Rich says. Even though we call them "blends," they're not really. Usually you can tell they're overlays if you look very closely, or you can see the striations where the two colors meet and kind of "interweave." Unless there's a discoloration there caused by a chemical reaction between the two, as Edna pointed out.

So far as I know.

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Yes,you can put 2 differant colors of glass together,to make 1 color.It happened the last 2 weekends at Jabo.

Red and yellow,will make orange.Just depends on your "cooking" methods.

I see blue and green,on white.You can have "color" variations,depending on the density of the strike.

Yep,"color" variations,due to chemical compositions,and reactions too.

Now where is the Coors?----LOL

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I agree you can put two colors of glass together and get another color. Blue and yellow has been put together for green and many others. Sometimes done on purpose and sometimes not,over and over at Jabo. There is also crystal clear glass that when heated to a certian temp,makes a nice ruby red glass.

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Actually, chemical reactions can give other colors in glass. Silver metals, coppers and golds can give altered colors in glass. All this is done at the molecular level Galen.

You can not take red and white glass, for example, and make pink in glass - it is impossible! I'd love to see anyone put two colors together and make a third color in glass. (We are not talking bout the reactive glass as I described above.) Paint colors, of course you can. but not glass.

Someone suggest 2 different colors and I will do the experiment and take pictures for you to show you what will happen. I'll be back next week from my vacation in Utah, Nevada and California taking photos.

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Powder won't work as it makes the glass get muddy - come over and I'll show you Galen.

Today I'll make 3 marbles for you guys using red, white and blue but you'll have to wait until tomorrow to see the results as I always anneal my work for safety.

One marble will be 6 2" pieces and I'll attempt to twist the heck out of them to try and blend them so the original colors will go away and make a lite purple color (if it reacts like paint). The 2nd marble I'll smash the 6 2" pieces into frit and make a frit marble out of them. The 3rd marble of 6 2" pieces I'll make glass powder and make a marble out of that to see if that will make a new color.

Rich

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Thanks for the cool work Rich but we are still talking two completely different things IMO. Torch work vs a Furnace. I agree it would be extremely difficult to mix two colors of glass into a third in a torch. I also think we may be talking about two differnt things when it comes to what happens at the edge of two different stream vs mixing in a furnace. 2 colors mixed in a furnace do not always make nasty colors.

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Bet someone could post an example of a marble where two glass colors blended. I've tried just a little to find an example but it's trial and error to make them come up in searches.

Looks like maybe both some blending and some overlaying going on in Bo's marble in post #6 here: http://marbleconnect...showtopic=15038

How would you characterize the yellow-green on Craig's marble at the beginning of that thread?

Anyone have what they think are more obvious examples?

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Blended, as I see in the picture, is what happens when the molten glass is twisting both inside the oven when blending with the other colors and makes the curves sometimes as the marble first travels down the rollers. Glass blends but doesn't mix like paint does.

Please give me until tomorrow to show you the marbles that are in my kiln for pictorial examples. They will certainly show you what i am trying to convey about glass (if I am lucky...lol).

It took me a long time with several attempts to mix glass to make different colors as I have tried at least 20 times to make a pink glass that was vibrant pink with no luck. It could be that I didn't have the right formula but I did get 16 different pink rods that were made in Italy, Germany and the USA for the experiment - failed each and every time - that glass did not go pink like I was trying to get. The glass did blend but not mix.

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Here's a old Akro (dug) where the blue and yellow blend/mix/amalgamate/incorporate/whateveryawannacallit into a line of green

blend%20glass%20and%20Lilly%20007.jpg

blend%20glass%20and%20Lilly%20008.jpg

blend%20glass%20and%20Lilly%20009.jpg

I remember reading over at GA good awhile back..in the Black & White Marble Contest, a glass worker was making a marble for the contest and had problems with the black and white mixing and forming a gray streak/line..or something like that...so there ya go.

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